DIY - Making Lard That Lasts 

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee -- My stomach is rumbling. Well, not really rumbling so much as gurgling, burbling, growling, and I could swear it just made a barking kind of noise. (Frankly, the barking has me a bit worried.) You see, my house is innundated with the smell of porcine protein and fat - and has been since 9:00 this morning, five hours ago. It's got about two hours to go.

I'm rendering lard.

Once or twice a year I get some pork fat, render it down, and freeze it. Then come fall I can make an apple pie crust worthy of the effort of making the crust from scratch, or fry to-die-for chicken for a summer picnic, or roast some fresh green beans that will make your mouth sing.

But in the process I get a few puzzled looks. The first time I approached Laurel Creek farms owner Tracy Monday about getting some pork fat was weirder than I expected. I'd been buying from Tracy for awhile and this was right after I'd bought Charcuterie and learned that the best lard, something I'd made once before, is made from what's called "leaf fat," the fat found around the pig's kidneys.

First, the idea that I wanted to buy pork fat was weird to Tracy. This was about five years ago and the concept of making one's own lard or sausage was still unusual here in Knoxville (it probably still is for most people). Also, he had no idea what leaf fat was and given that I'd never seen it I had trouble describing it to him. I eventually ended up with about a pound of fat that, if I remember correctly, rendered down to about a cup of lard.

These days Tracy knows what leaf fat is and his commercial customers get most of it. So I make do with trimmings which make fine lard and are completely suitable for sausage. But the odd looks don't really stop. When I picked this lard up at Tracy's new retail outlet the poor young tattooed clerk was as puzzled as Tracy had been years ago.

Why make lard? I can cruise into the nearest Latin American mercado and buy a pound or a gallon of Armour Manteca. That's what the wife of the guy mowing my condo's lawn does and then she uses it to make gorditas just like her grandmother's and the tamales her husband swears by. But that lard is processed; it's adulterated with preservatives and partially hydrogenated to make it shelf-stable. It's nowhere near as good as lard can be.

Today's rendering will produce about four cups of which I've promised two to friends. The remainder I'll use mostly in the four or five pie crusts I make a year. I'll likely roast potatoes in some of this rendered lard and saute greens in some more. Try brushing a chicken with lard and then roasting it - beats butter by miles. With potatoes (and anything else you might deep fry) add a quarter cup or lard to the oil for a richer flavor. And spread a bit of melted lard on a grilled cheese sandwich instead of butter for an obscenely good treat.

Making lard isn't hard, but it takes a strong stomach. You begin by cutting the fat up into 3/4-inch square chunks - more or less. This should fill your pot by about two thirds- figure a four quart pot for four pounds of fat. Then add an inch of water and place the pot over a burner on low.

For the first couple of hours, as the fat stews in the water, the odor is funky. It doesn't smell bad, but it doesn't smell good either. This is the easy part. After a couple of hours the water has all evaporated and the fat is melting in fat and it starts smelling good. Crazy good. Mouth-watering good. Chew your arm off good. It's torture. You sit there, trying to ignore that wonderful pork aroma so that some evening you can make a wonderfully flakey, richly flavored shells for Cornish pasties or make Maine Fries that even John Thorne would relish.

And you start thinking, "I should add some salt to that," or, "A few sprigs of rosemary would be perfect," or, "Maybe a few juniper berries would help." In short you start wanting to cook. But you're not cooking, you're producing an ingredient. Anything you do now will come back to haunt you in later pie crusts, french fries, or turnip greens.

The lard isn't a painting, it's the white gesso on a canvas - the foundation the painting relies upon - and if you color to the white the final painting will suffer. Lard

4 pounds pork fat, cut into 1/2 - 3/4-inch pieces

1 1/2 cups water

Pour water into a 4 quart soup/stock pot. Add fat. Place over low heat and cook, stirring occasionally, for 6 hours until fat browns. (Note: Water will evaporate, don't replenish.) Filter through cheese cloth, cool and freeze. Keeps 6 - 9 months in freezer.

Copyright (c) 2007, SteelWill, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Spot On is a trademark of SteelWill, Inc.

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