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Re: “Oakland Takes First Step Toward Embracing Urban Agriculture


Re: “Oakland Takes First Step Toward Embracing Urban Agriculture”
As a pet rabbit fan, I think the possibility of the butchering of rabbits next door could be an issue. There are millions (estimated at 1.5 to 4 million) people who have rabbits as pets in the United States. In fact, there are several rabbit rescue organizations in the Bay Area including the House Rabbit Society which is headquartered near Oakland. Rabbits are the third most popular pet in the USA behind cats and dogs. This isn't an issue with being a vegan or an overly sentimental attachment to Thumper, or Bugs Bunny cartoon characters, as some rabbit meat producers, “urban” farmers and trendy chefs like to suggest. It is a big issue with the growing number of people who know these animals as pets. Plus, the so called "meat" rabbits such as the New Zealand Whites, Californians, Harlequins, Satins and others are some of the best socialized pets. They also make great “therapy rabbits” just like dogs who visit long-term care facilities and hospices. There are places in this world, particularly in some areas of Asian countries where dogs and cats are consumed as food routinely. Just recently 500 dogs were rescued from a truck bound for a slaughterhouse in China. We don't eat cats and dogs in this country because of a cartoon images in the movies or on TV and we don't want them butchered in the next door neighbor's backyard. People with rabbits as companion animals definitely don't want this slaughter in their neighborhood. Rabbits are exactly like dogs and cats in many ways. They purr (softly grinding their teeth) when petted, can be littered box trained, clicker trained like dogs, enjoy affection, bond with their owners for life and other animals, and can be cage free in a bunny-proofed home. We don't poach Poodles or simmer Siamese cats. Since humans are omnivores why braise a bunny. People have plenty of other choices for food and protein. Rabbits carry zoonotic diseases that can be transmitted if not cooked properly, too. Most are kept in small wire cages for their short lives which do not provide adequate room. The wires cut into rabbit feet since they don’t have pads on them like cats or dogs. However, since rabbits are butchered for meat anywhere from 7 weeks to 12 weeks old with many killed even before they are weaned at 8 weeks, some who raise them for meat feel there is no need to provide adequate accommodations. There is nothing cartoonish about eating a baby rabbit - it is grotesque and repulsive to the millions of us who know them as pets.

Posted by rabbit fanster on 06/16/2011 at 3:11 PM

Re: “Oakland Takes First Step Toward Embracing Urban Agriculture

As a pet rabbit fan, I think the possibility of the butchering of rabbits next door could be an issue. There are millions (estimated at 1.5 to 4 million) of people who have rabbits as pets in the United States. In fact, there are several rabbit rescue organizations in the Bay Area including the House Rabbit Society which is headquartered near Oakland. Rabbits are the third most popular pet in the USA behind cats and dogs. This isn't an issue with being a vegan or an overly sentimental attachment to Thumper, or Bugs Bunny cartoon characters, as some rabbit meat producers, “urban” farmers and trendy chefs like to suggest. It is a big issue with the growing number of people who know these animals as pets. Plus, the so called "meat" rabbits such as the New Zealand Whites, Californians, Harlequins, Satins and others are some of the best socialized pets. They also make great “therapy rabbits” just like dogs who visit long-term care facilities and hospices. There are places in this world, particularly in some areas of Asian countries where dogs and cats are consumed as food routinely. Just recently 500 dogs were rescued from a truck bound for a slaughterhouse in China. We don't eat cats and dogs in this country because of a cartoon images in the movies or on TV and we don't want them butchered in the next door neighbor's backyard. People with rabbits as companion animals definitely don't want this slaughter in their neighborhood. Rabbits are exactly like dogs and cats in many ways. They purr (softly grinding their teeth) when petted, can be littered box trained, clicker trained like dogs, enjoy affection, bond with their owners for life and other animals, and can be cage free in a bunny-proofed home. We don't poach Poodles or simmer Siamese cats. Since humans are omnivores why braise a bunny. People have plenty of other choices for food and protein. Rabbits carry zoonotic diseases that can be transmitted if not cooked properly, too. Most are kept in small wire cages for their short lives which do not provide adequate room. The wires cut into rabbit feet since they don’t have pads on them like cats or dogs. However, since rabbits are butchered for meat anywhere from 7 weeks to 12 weeks old with many killed even before they are weaned at 8 weeks, there is no need to provide adequate accommodations. There is nothing cartoonish about eating a baby rabbit - it is grotesque and repulsive to the millions of us who know them as pets.

Posted by rabbit fanster on 06/16/2011 at 3:07 PM

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