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Comment Archives: stories: News & Opinion: Feature

Re: “Project Censored

Can we get a list of local underreported stories?

Posted by Mike Hutchinson on 10/04/2017 at 1:03 PM

Re: “Project Censored

I started reporting on the threat of antibiotic resistance and the political climate around it as early as 2008.

Posted by citizenkrans on 10/04/2017 at 9:40 AM

Re: “Project Censored

Apparently Random Length News is unaware of lengthy and in-depth articles and series on these very coverage of most of these topics by:

The New Republic

Mother Jones News

The Atlantic

and last but far from least,

The Prospect.

EBX is now going outside it's own ranks for poor journalism and research.

Posted by Bruce Ferrell on 10/03/2017 at 10:41 PM

Re: “The East Bay Still Has Some Very Visible Reminders of Our History of Racism

Your articles are going to need footnotes and dated, identified photos. I looked forward to the scholarship.

Posted by Joan Soo on 09/24/2017 at 4:43 PM

Re: “Hidden Monuments to Racism

Unsurprisingly, many white Berkeleyites don't enjoy the open acknowledgement that the most recent zoning and building restriction are meant to keep the foothill neighborhoods white. And have succeeded in doing so adroitly.

These same people will view themselves as enlightened when the zoning and building restrictions are reduced now that primarily white genteifiers are the only ones who can afford new rentals or condos in the bay.

Same as it ever was.

Posted by Mercy Garetz on 09/23/2017 at 6:23 PM

Re: “Hidden Monuments to Racism

I think there is a typo in paragraph 6.

"the U.S. Supreme outlawed"

Did you mean the California State Supreme Court?

Posted by jbott on 09/23/2017 at 5:50 PM

Re: “The Albany Cross Resurrects Memories of the KKK

People need to get a life. Eradicating things which make you uncomfortable is a weakness. Instead of attacking religion, try contributing to science.

Posted by Hoecheck on 09/23/2017 at 1:05 PM

Re: “Hidden Monuments to Racism

Gammon mixes a few facts with a bunch of unsupported assertions to weave a myth about a racist recent history of Berkeley and North Oakland. Yes, it's true that developers of middle-class areas in the teens and twenties routinely inserted racially restrictive covenants. It was a time period when the U.S. has a lot to be ashamed of, not the least the tremendously racist Johnson-Reed Immigration Act of 1924. There's also lots of evidence that redevelopment in the 1950s and 1960s was covertly, if not overtly, racist in destroying lower class and minority neighborhoods across the U.S. None of this bears on the current or recent past zoning of Lower Rockridge (below Broadway), which was a reaction to an attempt in the early 1970s by Oakland real estate interests to replace its homes and small apartment buildings with mid-rise office and apartment buildings. That had nothing to do with race, and everything to do with resisting big money and protecting a human-scale neighborhood.

Posted by stu in Oakland on 09/23/2017 at 12:22 PM

Re: “Hidden Monuments to Racism

Thanks, Kat! I found this brief history fascinating. Even though I lived in Berkeley for many years, I never knew about the deed restrictions. But I think it does the story, the history, and the pillars a disservice to call them "Monuments to racism." They are relics of racist events in the past, but were not built to praise or honor racism. If they are monuments to something, they are monuments to eliminating racism.

Posted by Geoff Alexander on 09/22/2017 at 4:32 PM

Re: “The Albany Cross Resurrects Memories of the KKK

Different writers focus on different things, and I thought this article was very much on point regarding the issue of the varying meanings of the cross in the public park to various people. The suggested corrections on other matters (e.g. easements and eucalyptus) generally look right to me as well.

One point I would emphasize: Albany is actually a racially and religiously diverse place today, which is one of the things the city has pointed out to the Albany Lions Club in asking them to rethink their position. It is no longer a white enclave, although it is certainly true that Albany has an unusually small African American population for an East Bay 'flatlands' city. We know the size of that population is no accident - the century-ago Klan activity is just one element of a lengthy history of racial exclusion that included deed restriction, redlining, racist real estate sales practices, and communal rejection of potential neighbors.

On the other hand, many formerly excluded groups, in particular people of Asian origin, have gained a very substantial footing here in more recent years. Those of us who value diversity have reason to hope that we can look forward to having more African American neighbors too. To make that happen, our society will have to make progress against economic injustice, and our community will have to make progress against the negative history of race here as well as the social attitudes that sadly still recur - as each generation of young people needs to learn for itself the necessity of mutual respect and understanding.

Posted by Rochelle Nason on 09/22/2017 at 2:30 PM

Re: “One of Oakland's Most Historic Figures Was Also Horribly Racist

The comments here which are thoughtful and researched contrast greatly with the subject article which is shallow and obviously written to stir emotion and gain attention. There is no hard evidence that JK was a "diehard" racist. He was not a member of any racist organizations nor did he espouse any racist views during his run for mayor of Oakland. London commented "to Hell with the Constitution " quoting the abolitionist leader, William Lloyd Garrison, saying "To Hell with the Constitution " when that document was used to defend slavery. Neither should London be condemned because of his fictional writings just because some people figure authors only express their own views when writing fiction. By their standards we should condemn Alfred Hitchcock as a murderer. Finally and most importantly, we honor Jack London not as a sociologist or a politician, but as writer of adventure stories.

Posted by Andrew Stevenson on 09/22/2017 at 1:54 PM

Re: “Lieutenant Governor Hopeful Gayle McLaughlin Wants to Take the East Bay’s Progressive Revolution to Sacramento

The McLaughlin and the RPA represents what can be accomplished when politicians make policy based on values and sound judgment rather than just doing whatever will get them re-elected (e.g. Chevron money).

The quotes from Tom Butt are hilarious. This is a guy who openly opposed rent control because he represents landlords and developers. I'm sure he would've preferred "compromise," that way he and his landlord buddies can continue to enrich themselves on the backs of Richmond's renters, who make up a majority of residents and are seeing 20% increases in one month.

Myrick is just a spineless politician who blows with the wind. Other than making a backroom deal with Chevron (the only other person present was Butt), he's accomplished absolutely nothing. What he calls "compromise" is really just sacrificing the interests of constituents in order to cater to a powerful interest (Chevron). Richmond residents deserved and would have gotten much more from Chevron if he hadn't secretly made a deal with them.

Butt and Myrick can credibly say that they don't share RPA's viewpoints. But they cannot credibly say that RPA has not gotten results. In fact, if nothing else, RPA has shown that huge changes are possible if we disregard politics as usual.

Posted by Charles Jury on 09/22/2017 at 1:14 PM

Re: “Hidden Monuments to Racism

I wish this story included the fact that organizations that preserve local history and protect architecture- have fully owned this fact- and have shared the information as the controversial information it is, in their tours for the public. Therefore efforts to remedy the past -by recognizing it and educating the tour attendees, have been made (without pressure) and it is completely misrepresentative of the author of this to not see it and acknowledge it.

Posted by kat eiswald on 09/22/2017 at 9:50 AM

Re: “Glossing Over a Genocide

Fremont was one of the first to explore the area. I don't think there were that many settlers at the time.

Posted by Dipstick on 09/22/2017 at 8:34 AM

Re: “The Albany Cross Resurrects Memories of the KKK

Although the Supreme Court has historically been divided on public displays of a cross, establishing a clear separation of church and state can only help our country move towards our democratic ideals of promoting the general welfare, liberty and equal rights for all. I believe a Christian symbol overlooking a diverse community is inappropriate, insensitive and, for some community members, offensive. The Lion's Club International has clear ethics and purposes which prohibit members from public debate of "partisan politics and sectarian religion." Let the Albany Lion's Club live up to their stated ethics and purposes and the City of Albany live up to our democratic ideals. Let us move the cross to a religious setting or private land and warmly welcome everyone to our public land.

Posted by Anne Zolfaghari on 09/22/2017 at 8:11 AM

Re: “Glossing Over a Genocide

They weren't settlers! They were invaders! Colonizers!!! Build a wall!!!

Good deity! I have NO idea what the editors and "writers" for EBX are ingesting, but it sure results in whacked out stuff.

Posted by Bruce Ferrell on 09/22/2017 at 7:07 AM

Re: “Glossing Over a Genocide

What a weird piece. No mention that the Wintu were attacking settlers. Okay. But to ignore Fremont's legacy in the Republican party, or his move to end slavery in the West? Unconscionably biased.

Posted by Jennifer Emick on 09/22/2017 at 12:23 AM

Re: “Hidden Monuments to Racism

Racism or prudence?

Posted by SamanthaCantrel on 09/21/2017 at 9:13 PM

Re: “Hidden Monuments to Racism

Check out the history of International House in Berkeley.. A early beginning of change:http://ihouse.berkeley.edu/about/history.php

Posted by Monroe Pastermack on 09/21/2017 at 8:30 PM

Re: “One of Oakland's Most Historic Figures Was Also Horribly Racist

I could add many facts to support my belief that Jack London was not a racist, but his daughter Joan offers one story worth sharing. In her book, "Jack London and his Daughters", she recalled happily playing with a black girl named Annie in West Oakland. One day, white boys called her names for playing with a black girl and for being at Jennie Prentiss's home. She yelled that Jennie was not black as she ran into Jennie's kitchen. She recalled that she did not see Jennie as black, and different from her, until that moment. Jennie comforted her and gave her some cookies. She ended the story by telling that she went back to her friend "-Annie, who was also black, beloved Annie who was my friend." I grew up in Kern Co among a lot of racists, and I know that racists teach young children their hatred. Joan (1901 - 1971) graduated from Cal and worked as a researcher and director of publications for the CA State Federation of Labor. She coauthored "So Shall Ye Reap: The Story of Cesar Chavez and the Farm Workers' Movement. She credited her father for encouraging her lifelong commitment to worker rights.

Posted by Lisa Hire on 09/21/2017 at 5:56 PM

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