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Comment Archives: stories: News & Opinion: Letters: Last 30 Days

Re: “Letters of The Week: Our Readers Chime in on Alameda Landlords

Frank Snapp, I assume you're being sarcastic. In response: No one's looking to take the shirt off your back. What we want as a public asset is that pile of shirts you were planning to rent to those with nothing to wear.

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 11/14/2017 at 2:10 AM

Re: “Letters of The Week: Our Readers Chime in on Alameda Landlords

Frank Snapp: I've got a better idea. Let's just nationalize all the assets of the wealthy scum who have assets, and give them to the needy poor.

That will surely fix things and bring about economic equity.

Posted by Ernest Montague on 11/08/2017 at 9:40 AM

Re: “Letters of the Week: Our Readers Chime in on Last Week's Issue

Mr. Sagehorn, you're right. It's not a "conspiracy" -- but has it ever occurred to you that most people don't have something called a "portfolio," and can't afford to be players in the game you describe? People should be free to play the game, but survival shouldn't be dependent on it: when it is, that's its own form of totalitarianism (the hegemony of Ownership). For vast numbers of people, true economic freedom comes down to freedom FROM economic need -- not the privilege of gambling on property if they so choose.

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 10/30/2017 at 11:56 PM

Re: “Letters of the Week: Our Readers Chime in on Last Week's Issue

Im ignorant? Hardly. Housing in the United States is a commodity- associated with real property which is valued and revalued in every economic cycle. Property in the Oakland Hills was once cheap and used primarily for ranching and logging. Now its valued much higher. Folks who cant/wont invest their incomes in home ownership will always struggle when the sale value of their rented homes/apartments exceeds the rental returns it generates to the owner. The crisis Ms. Calef speaks of is not a crisis but rather the simple economic lesson of supply and demand. Urban and suburban neighborhoods are always susceptible to change, but its not from any sinister plot by any group, color, or political party. Renting is not investing.

Posted by michael.sagehorn on 10/26/2017 at 4:33 PM

Re: “Letters of the Week: Our Readers Chime in on Last Week's Issue

Mr. Sagehorn reveals his ignorance of the housing crisis and home ownership in general with his comments. Most renters would be home owners if they could afford to buy into their own home but they cannot. They don't have the funds and don't have the income.
There IS something sinister about our economic history which has consistently awarded tax breaks to the top 10% richest in the country and kept wages flat for the past four decades. Learn from that Mr. Sagehorn.
E. Calef

Posted by liza calef on 10/25/2017 at 1:25 PM

Re: “Letters of the Week: Our Readers Chime in on Last Week's Issue

Ms. Chen: The issue of what makes the folks of West Oakland vulnerable to housing displacement is neither their color nor creed, but rather their choice to be renters not owners. As demand for property in Oakland grows, rents and property prices will all rise. Theres nothing sinister about economics. Learn from it.

Posted by michael.sagehorn on 10/25/2017 at 7:36 AM

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