Thursday, June 18, 2020

Thursday's Briefing: Fake body found hanging in effigy at Lake Merritt; San Leandro City Council votes to defund police

Former CoCo registrar charged with 34 felonies

by Steven Tavares
Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 4:00 AM

San Leandro officials narrowly voted to shift money from its police department to social programs and services. - STEVEN TAVARES
  • Steven Tavares
  • San Leandro officials narrowly voted to shift money from its police department to social programs and services.


News you don't want to miss for June 18:

1. "An effigy was found hanging from a tree near Oakland's Lake Merritt Thursday morning, horrifying residents," SFGate reports. On Wednesday, there was reports of nooses hanging from trees at Lake Merritt. They were later determined to be exercise equipment.

2. A Tesla worker at the Fremont factory who previously criticized the company's covid-19 safety measures has been terminated, the East Bay Times reports. $$

4. "The California Senate declined on Thursday to advance a bill that would have banned commercial evictions statewide and allowed some retail tenants to break leases during the coronavirus crisis," the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

5. Former Contra Costa County Registrar of Voters Joe Canciamilla was charged with 34 felonies on Wednesday, the East Bay Times reports. Canciamilla, who was previously a county supervisor and state legislator, is alleged to have used $261,800 in campaign funds for personal use. $$

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Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Wednesday's Briefing: Oakland investigates nooses hanging from trees at Lake Merritt; McDonald's workers sue over spread of covid-19 in workplace

San Leandro releases video of incident alleged to have caused miscarriage

by Steven Tavares
Wed, Jun 17, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Lake Merritt - STEPHEN TEIXEIRA
  • Stephen Teixeira
  • Lake Merritt


News you don't want to miss for June 17:

1. Oakland officials are investigating the appearance of three nooses hanging from trees in Lake Merritt, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The incident is being investigated as a potential hate crime, although there is some speculation the nooses may have been used for exercise. $$

2. Allegations by a woman who said San Leandro police officers stomped on her belly and caused a miscarriage appear to be false, the East Bay Citizen reports. Police body-camera video released by the city on Wednesday revealed the woman telling police that, while she had been eight-months pregnant, she lost the baby during a medical procedure earlier in the day.

3. Oscar Grant's family is calling for BART Board Director Debora Allen to resign, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Last week, Allen said during a board meeting that its police force does not murder people. Grant was killed by BART cop Johannes Mehserle at the Fruitvale station in 2009

4. The fall semester at U.C. Berkeley will include a few in-person classes, but all courses will be available online, SFGate reports.

5. Workers at the Oakland McDonald's, where at least 11 employees tested positive for covid-19, filed a lawsuit on Tuesday alleging the restaurant's management did little to stem the spread of the disease, KQED reports. The McDonald's on Telegraph Avenue has been closed since May 26.

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Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Tuesday's Briefing: 'Defund the Police' movement takes protests to Oakland official's homes; Air Force sergeant charged in killing of federal guard in Oakland

Oakland Airport traffic is improving

by Steven Tavares
Tue, Jun 16, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Protesters visited Oakland Councilmember Noel Gallo's home on Monday morning. - SHANE BOND
  • Shane Bond
  • Protesters visited Oakland Councilmember Noel Gallo's home on Monday morning.


News you don't want to miss for June 16:

1. Advocates for defunding the Oakland Police Department brought the issue to the homes of Councilmembers Noel Gallo, Dan Kalb, and Loren Taylor on Monday morning, ABC7 reports. The Oakland City Council will hear a resolution today calling for some police funding to be reallocated to community programs and services.

2. Federal law enforcement officials charged Steven Carrillo with killing David Patrick Underwood, the federal security guard fatally shot at the Ron Dellums Federal Building in Oakland on May 29, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Officials say Carrillo supported a right-wing extremist group. Carrillo is also charged with killing a sheriff's deputy in Santa Cruz. $$

3. The son of Union City's former police chief, and another man, was charged with murder in the shooting death in the Uptown neighborhood of Oakland last August, KTVU reports. Tyrone McAllister, 19, could face the death penalty.

4. A fourth-grade teacher in San Lorenzo was arrested by Alameda County sheriff's detective for suspicion of possessing assault weapons and methamphetamine, the East Bay Times reports. $$

5. PG&E plead guilty to 84 counts of involuntary manslaughter over the devastating Camp Fire that leveled Paradise in 2018, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

6. As life on the ground slowly begins to reopen, so is the heavenly skies. Airplane traffic at the Oakland Airport greatly increased in May after a precipitous drop off in March and April due to the pandemic, the East Bay Times reports. $$

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Monday, June 15, 2020

Monday's Briefing: Kaiser Permanente's computer system was down for five hours; State AG wants law to strip bad cops of their badges

U.S. Supreme Court lets stand California's sanctuary state law

by Steven Tavares
Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 4:00 AM

A hospital room at the Kaiser Permanente medical center in San Leandro. - KAISER PERMANENTE
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • A hospital room at the Kaiser Permanente medical center in San Leandro.


News you don't want to miss for June 15:

1. Kaiser Permanente's computer system went down for five hours on Sunday, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Although the pandemic has yet to overrun Bay Area hospitals, the outage, which is yet unexplained, is concerning. $$

2. "California Attorney General Xavier Becerra on Monday called for legislation that would help decertify police officers for serious misconduct — a type of accountability platform that has been long missing in a state that prides itself on criminal justice reforms," the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

3. Gov. Gavin Newsom dropped a proposal to help balance the state's $54 billion budget shortfall by cutting some funding for child care services and limiting the number of people eligible for Medicaid, the Associated Press reports.

4. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that employers may not discriminate based on sexual orientation and gender identity, Politico reports. California has long ban this type of workplace discrimination, but 21 states still had these laws on the books.

5. Supreme Court justices will not hear the Trump administration's claim that California's 2017 sanctuary city laws conflict with federal immigration law/a>, the Associated Press reports. The move means a lower court decision upholding the law will stand.

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Friday, June 12, 2020

Friday's Briefing: Federal civil rights lawsuit filed against Oakland for use of tear gas; 37 test positive for covid-19 at Hayward hospital

Activists want to remove Sir Francis Drake's name in Marin

by Steven Tavares
Fri, Jun 12, 2020 at 4:00 AM

A spent tear gas cannister. - WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
  • Wikimedia Commons
  • A spent tear gas cannister.


News you don't want to miss for June 12-14:

1. Activist groups in Oakland filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city on Thursday for its crowd-control tactics, including the use of tear gas, flash-bang grenades, and rubber bullets, the East Bay Times reports.

2. BART Board Director Debora Allen took umbrage at public comments asserting the transit agency's police force has committed murder in the past, SFGate reports. Several BART directors called out Allen's comments as racist.

3. BART board directors on Thursday, however, chose to maintain the police department's level of funding for the upcoming Fiscal Year 2021 budget, SFGate reports.

4. Activists in Marin want to erase Sir Francis Drake's name from a city street and remove his namesake statue, ABC7 reports. In addition to being an explorer, Drake was also a slave trader.

5. Thirty-seven health care workers at St. Rose Hospital in Hayward tested positive for covid-19, the East Bay Times reports. About half have already recuperated. $$

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Thursday, June 11, 2020

Thursday's Briefing: OUSD trustees introduce plan to eliminate campus police; Throng of protesters march to Schaaf's home

Proposition to reinstate affirmative action moves closer to November ballot

by Steven Tavares
Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Oakland Unified School District Trustees Roseann Torres and Shanthi Gonzales introduced a resolution on Wednesday to eliminate the district's police force. - FILE PHOTOS
  • File photos
  • Oakland Unified School District Trustees Roseann Torres and Shanthi Gonzales introduced a resolution on Wednesday to eliminate the district's police force.


News you don't want to miss for June 11:

1. Oakland Unified School District Trustees Roseann Torres and Shanthi Gonzales introduced a resolution on Wednesday to eliminate the school district's police force by the end of this year, and reallocate the district's $2.3 million budget for law enforcement, KTVU reports. OUSD Superintendent Kyla Johnson-Trammell said she supports the resolution, which will be voted on sometime this summer.

2. Proposed ballot language that would amend the Oakland City Charter to allow the Police Commission to hire its own civilian inspector general was approved by the City Council, the East Bay Times reports. The wording of the proposed ballot measure now heads to the Oakland Police Department through the meet-and-confer negotiating process. $$

3. Hundreds of protesters marched on Wednesday evening to the home of Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf in an effort to urge her to support defunding the Oakland Police Department, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

4. A constitutional amendment asking voters to repeal Proposition 209 moved closer to the ballot on Wednesday, the San Francisco Chronicle. The proposition, approved by statewide voters in 1996, removed consideration for race from university enrollment decisions, in addition, to state hiring and contracting practices. $$

5. State judicial officials appeared close to removing a statewide moratorium on evictions and foreclosures, but reversed course on Wednesday, directing courts to keep the ban until lawmakers can find a legislative solution, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

6. Another 1.5 million Americans filed for unemployment last week as the total jobless claims tops 44 million since the beginning of the pandemic in March, Politico reports.

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Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Wednesday's Briefing: Berkeley City Council bans use of tear gas; Oakland Unified discusses dissolution of its police force

Judicial Council may end statewide pause on covid-19 foreclosures and evictions

by Steven Tavares
Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Several other Bay Area cities are contemplating a ban on tear gas. Some state legislators are doing the same. - WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
  • Wikimedia Commons
  • Several other Bay Area cities are contemplating a ban on tear gas. Some state legislators are doing the same.


News you don't want to miss for June 10:

1. Berkeley banned the use of tear gas on protesters by its police force on Tuesday, The Hill reports. City officials argued those infected by covid-19 may develop worse symptoms from damage to their lungs due to tear gas. But the City Council's legislation also has no end-date. Some Oakland officials have discussed a similar ban.

2. Oakland Unified School District trustees will discuss a plan on Wednesday to eliminate its police force, EdSource reports. The West Contra Costa School Board is also contemplating a similar proposal. OUSD's plan would dissolve its police force and rely on Oakland Police during emergency situations.

3. "California judicial leaders are considering an early end to statewide emergency orders suspending foreclosures and evictions during the coronavirus pandemic," the Associated Press reports. The move was condemned by some state lawmakers who believe the effects of covid-19 on the health of residents and the economy remains dire.

4. Contra Costa County will allow restaurants, bars, gyms, museums, and places of worship to reopen on July 1, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Furthermore, barber shops and hair salons can reopen on June 17. $$

5. Angela Underwood Jacobs, the sister of Patrick Underwood, the federal security guard killed on May 29 by a gunman at the Ronald Dellums Federal Building in Oakland, testified before Congress on Wednesday, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. She urged lawmakers to "make a change" when it comes to laws that discourage police accountability. $$

6. Claudell Washington, a Berkeley native and two-two All-Star, who was part of the Oakland A's title run in 1974, died on Tuesday at the age of 65, USA Today reports. Washington played for seven Major League teams, but began his career with the A's at the age of 19.

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Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Tuesday's Briefing: PG&E is moving to Oakland in possible record-breaking real estate deal; Tesla workers tested positive for covid-19

Watch out for rattlesnakes!

by Steven Tavares
Tue, Jun 9, 2020 at 4:00 AM

Kaiser Center office building in downtown Oakland. - WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
  • Wikimedia Commons
  • Kaiser Center office building in downtown Oakland.


News you don't want to miss for June 9:

1. After 115 years, PG&E is leaving San Francisco for new headquarters in Oakland, SFist reports. The embattled utility is slated to move to the Kaiser Center office building on Lakeside Drive. The potential price tag is $892 million.

2. A town hall on Oakland Police use-of-force policies brought on a lively discussion on Monday, the East Bay Times reports. The town hall was organized by the Oakland Police Commission. $$

3. Richmond Mayor Tom Butt, through his personal blog, blasted his city council colleagues and city officials, while describing a city government drowning in dysfunction, the East Bay Times reports. $$

4. Some Tesla employees at the electric car plant in Fremont tested positive for covid-19 shortly after it reopened in May, the Washington Post reports. Tesla founder Elon Musk fought vigorously with Alameda County officials to reopen the factory. It appears the employees infected may not live in Alameda County. $$

5. An unseasonably warm February may be triggering an uptick in rattlesnake sightings in the Bay Area, KPIX reports. The warm weather kickstarted an earlier than normal mating season for the rattlesnakes.

6. The Department of Motor Vehicles will reopen for business on Thursday, the East Bay Times reports. Of course, social distancing guidelines will be in place. $$

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Monday, June 8, 2020

Monday's Briefing: CHP kills suspect in Oakland, injures pregnant girlfriend; FBI sees possible link between Santa Cruz and Oakland killings

Bay Area health officials worry protests will spike covid-19 cases

by Steven Tavares
Mon, Jun 8, 2020 at 4:00 AM

California Highway Patrol officers believe the man fatally shot last Saturday night in Oakland was in possession of a car stolen during the looting of a Dodge dealership in San Leandro. - FILE PHOTO
  • File photo
  • California Highway Patrol officers believe the man fatally shot last Saturday night in Oakland was in possession of a car stolen during the looting of a Dodge dealership in San Leandro.


News you don't want to miss for June 8:

1. California Highway Patrol fatally shot 23-year-old Erik Salgado, and injured his pregnant girlfriend during a pursuit on Saturday night in Oakland, NBC Bay Area reports. Police told the TV station that Salgado was suspected of driving one of 74 cars that were stolen from a San Leandro Dodge dealership during extensive looting on May 31.

2. The FBI is investigating whether an Air Force sergeant suspected of killing a sheriff's deputy in Santa Cruz had any involvement in the killing of a federal security guard during a protest in Oakland on May 29, the Associated Press reports. Both incidents involved vans, the FBI said.

3. A week ago, Alameda County saw a three-day spike in new covid-19 cases. Now, public health officials are worried a regional surge in cases is going to follow a week of heavily-attended protests all the Bay Area, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. $$

4. Meanwhile, the Tri-Valley mayors of Dublin, Pleasanton, and Livermore are asking the Alameda County Public Health Department to allow the region, which has a low rate of covid-19 infections, to reopen quicker than the rest of the county, Pleasanton Weekly reports.

5. The Alameda County Superior Court reopened Monday for the resumption of some criminal and civil cases that were suspended by the Mar. 17 shelter in place order, KPIX reports. In addition, the process for the start of new trials will begin on June 29.

6. You can officially call the economic doldrums we're living through a recession, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research, Yahoo! Finance reports. The recession began in February and ended a record 128-month streak of economic expansion that started at the heels of the last recession in 2009.

7. The twin controversies involving Oakland A's management appears settled after John Fisher, the team's owner, admitted it was a mistake to stop paying a weekly stipend to its minor leaguers during the pandemic, ESPN reports. The team's other mea culpa last week was to agree to pay its $1.2 million rent at the Oakland Coliseum.

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Friday, June 5, 2020

Friday's Briefing: Authorities seek help finding looters who stole 29 firearms from Hayward gun shop; A's prepared to pay Coliseum rent soon

Newsom worries protests will spike new covid-19 cases

by Steven Tavares
Fri, Jun 5, 2020 at 4:00 AM

A's President Dave Kaval says the team recently sent a proposal to reopen the Coliseum to Alameda County health officials. - PHOTO COURTESY OF OAKLAND ATHLETICS
  • Photo courtesy of Oakland Athletics
  • A's President Dave Kaval says the team recently sent a proposal to reopen the Coliseum to Alameda County health officials.


News you don't want to miss for June 5-7:

1. Lost in the chaos of looting last weekend was the theft of 29 firearms from a gun shop in Hayward on Sunday night, KTVU reports. Between 30-40 people were involved in the break-in, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said. Authorities are asking for leads to locate suspects and the guns.

2. Gov. Gavin Newsom voiced concerns about a potential spike in covid-19 cases due to the protests across the state, and, in particular, African-Americans participating in the demonstrations, KRON reports. The rate of covid-19 infections among African-Americans in the state has consistently been disproportionately higher than any other racial demographic.

3. Early signs of a possible "V-shaped" economy were seen Friday as 2.5 million new jobs were added to the U.S. economy in May, CNN reports. A month after the U.S. unemployment rate skyrocketed to 14.7 percent in April, it dropped to 13.3 percent last month.

4. There's signs the covid-19 pandemic and shelter in place orders are triggering increased reports of domestic violence in the Bay Area, the East Bay Times reports. $$

5. PG&E was criticized by state regulators for failing to move quickly enough to install devices that would limit the number of homes affected by planned power-shutoffs necessitated by wildfires, the Associated Press reports.

6. The Oakland A's said they will pay their $1.2 million rent payment for use of the Coliseum once protocols for players and stadium personnel to safely use the stadium are put in place, Sports Illustrated reports. The A's recently sent its plan to reopen the Coliseum to the Alameda County Public Health Department.

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