Monday, October 16, 2017

Monday’s Briefing: NorCal Fires May Be Contained This Week; Bay Area Air Quality Bad Again Today

Plus, state Senate President Kevin de León launches bid to unseat Dianne Feinstein.

by Robert Gammon
Mon, Oct 16, 2017 at 10:17 AM

PHOTO COURTESY OF CAL-FIRE
  • Photo courtesy of Cal-Fire

Stories you shouldn’t miss for Oct. 16, 2017:

1. Firefighters are on track to contain two of the largest and most destructive Wine Country fires this week, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. Firefighters now have 70 percent containment on the deadliest blaze — the Tubbs Fire in Sonoma County — and 68 percent containment on the largest one — the Atlas Fire in Napa County. The death toll from the NorCal fires has reached 41, and there are at least 99 people still missing in Sonoma County alone. Rain is expected in the region later this week.

2. Because of northerly winds overnight, the Bay Area air quality is poor again today, after a respite over the weekend, reports Amy Graff of SFGate.com. Nonetheless, most school districts in the region reopened for classes today. Meteorologists are predicting that the region’s air quality will improve on Tuesday and Wednesday, thanks to onshore flows and the progress made by firefighters.

3. State Senate President Kevin de León, D-LA, officially launched his bid to unseat U.S. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., contending that the moderate Feinstein has largely failed to stand up to President Trump, the San Francisco Chronicle$ reports. De León argues that California and the nation needs more progressive leadership. Billionaire progressive activist Tom Steyer is also considering a run against the 84-year-old Feinstein.

4. Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed legislation that would have barred President Trump from the 2020 California ballot — unless he had agreed to release his tax returns, reports Bob Egelko of the San Francisco Chronicle. Browns’ move came as no surprise considering the fact that he also refused to release his tax returns during the past two gubernatorial elections.

5. The first year of community college tuition in California will be free starting next year, under a law signed by Gov. Brown, reports Melody Gutierrez of the San Francisco Chronicle. The new law will save full-time students about $1,104 a year.

6. California is creating a third gender option — nonbinary — for driver’s licenses and state IDs for people who don’t identify as male or female, under a new law signed by Brown, reports Melody Gutierrez of the San Francisco Chronicle. The new law will take effect in 2019.

7. Also, beginning in 2019, pet stores throughout the state will only be allowed to sell rescue animals, under a new law signed by Brown, reports Mina Corpuz of the LA Times$. Pet store owners will face a $500 fine if they sell non-rescue animals. California is the first in the nation to pass such a law, which is designed to eliminate puppy mills.

8. Gov. Brown also signed legislation banning cities and counties in California from providing information to a national Muslim registry — should President Trump establish one, as he has said he plans to do, reports Jazmine Ulloa of the LA Times$.

9. And the south end of Big Sur reopened on Friday after Caltrans crews worked overtime to complete a new bridge over Pfeiffer Canyon, reports Kurtis Alexander of the San Francisco Chronicle. The southern section of Big Sur had effectively been cut off from the outside world since last winter when the old Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge was badly damaged by mudslides.

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Friday, October 13, 2017

The East Bay SPCA Helps Overcrowded North Bay Animal Shelters Affected by Fire

by Matt St. John
Fri, Oct 13, 2017 at 5:17 PM

One of ten cats picked up by the East Bay SPCA at Marin Humane in Novato, to make room for animals displaced by the North Bay fires. - COURTESY OF THE EAST BAY SPCA
  • Courtesy of the East Bay SPCA
  • One of ten cats picked up by the East Bay SPCA at Marin Humane in Novato, to make room for animals displaced by the North Bay fires.

Since the beginning of the devastating North Bay fires on Sunday night, families and local institutions have been quick to open their homes and facilities to help evacuees. Unfortunately, not all of these shelters have room for pets, putting added stress on families already reeling from the loss of their houses and belongings.

To help mitigate this problem, animal shelters and clinics across the North Bay are offering free services for those affected by the fires. Marin Humane in Novado is accepting animals for emergency boarding, and the Sonoma Humane Society in Santa Rosa is offering free veterinary treatment for burned animals.

Due to community donations, North Bay shelters have plenty of pet food, supplies, toys, and transportation crates. But what they are running out of is space, according to Jules Shapiro of the East Bay SPCA.

To help ease congestion, the East Bay SPCA is making trips to shelters in the North Bay, picking up animals, and relocating them to the organization's Oakland and Dublin facilities. The goal is to make room in those shelters for animals displaced by the fires, providing families with pets some much needed relief.

“What we hope to do and like to do is really be a partner for others in a time of crisis,” said Shapiro.


As of yesterday, the organization brought 31 dogs and cats from shelters in the North Bay to Oakland and Dublin. Today, the organization added to that number, picking up 20 dogs and 26 cats from shelters in Solano County,

“Whenever we can be supportive of the community at large, we’re going to be there, and that’s what we’re doing right now,” said Shapiro.

The SPCA will evaluate the animals for health problems, such as smoke inhalation, and eventually will put them up for adoption. Shapiro said East Bay residents can help the effort by fostering pets waiting to be adopted, as well as donating dog and cat food at both of its locations.

The East Bay SPCA has limited boarding operations for pets affected by the fires as well. If you have been displaced by the fire and are in need of temporary boarding for your pet, call (510) 569-0702 for the Oakland location and (925)-479-9670 for Dublin.


Friday’s Briefing: Firefighters Make Progress as Death Toll Hits 31; Bay Area Air Pollution Rivals Beijing

by Robert Gammon
Fri, Oct 13, 2017 at 10:19 AM

tubbs_fire_coffey_park.jpg

Stories you shouldn’t miss for Oct. 13, 2017:

1. Firefighters continued to make progress last night on the massive North Bay fires, gaining 25 percent containment on the deadliest blaze — the Tubbs Fire in Sonoma County — and 27 percent containment on the largest one — the Atlas Fire in Napa County, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. But the death toll from the NorCal fires has climbed to 31 and is expected to rise as law enforcement officials comb through the debris with cadaver dogs. In all, the fires have destroyed about 3,000 homes and businesses and burned more than 200,000 acres. Fire crews are also concerned about this weekend because winds are expected to pick up tonight.

2. Air quality in the Bay Area due to the fires is so bad — the worst on record — this week that it rivals the infamously polluted Beijing, reports Erin Allday of the San Francisco Chronicle. Residents from around the region are reporting being sickened by the pollution, and many school districts are again closed today due to the bad air. In addition, numerous outdoor events scheduled for this weekend have been canceled or postponed.

3. Democratic state Senate President Kevin León is expected to launch a challenge next week to U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., reports Christopher Cadelago of the Sacramento Bee$. And the liberal de León may be joined in the 2018 race by billionaire progressive Tom Steyer. California liberals have become increasingly frustrated over the years with the moderate Feinstein.

4. Employees of small businesses will be eligible for up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to take care of a newborn as of Jan. 1, under a bill signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown, the Sacramento Bee$ reports. The new law will apply to about 2.8 million small businesses in California that employ between 20 and 49 workers. Companies that employ more than 50 people already must provide the 12-week-parental-leave benefit.

5. President Trump is continuing his effort to dismantle Obamacare, saying today that he will stop payment on health-care subsidies that help pay out-of-pocket costs of low-income people, The New York Times$ reports. The move could unravel the nation’s insurance markets and cause health care insurance premiums to soar.

6. And the Alameda Gold Coast Bistro and Bar, on Park Street at Clement Avenue, plans to close this Sunday after 25 years in business, reports Peter Hegarty of the East Bay Times$. The restaurants owners say they lost their lease and are being evicted.

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Oakland City Council to Hold Hearing on Controversial ICE Raid and Oakland Police Misinformation

by Darwin BondGraham
Thu, Oct 12, 2017 at 12:37 PM

ice.xcheckii.artsyarrestshot.jpg
The Oakland City Council's Public Safety Committee is scheduled to hold a hearing on Nov. 14 about the controversial Immigration and Customs Enforcement operation that took place on August 16 in West Oakland.

On that date, about two dozen ICE agents raided a home, leading to the arrest of one individual who is now facing possible deportation.

"There has been a significant amount of concern with respect to the raid that took place," Councilmember Desley Brooks said today at the council's rules committee meeting, which approved the upcoming hearing. At least two Oakland police officers assisted ICE during the raid by blocking streets to traffic.

Brooks said the events surrounding the ICE operation were especially troubling because the city council has set a sanctuary policy that bars any city employee, including police, from assisting federal immigration agents when they are enforcing civil immigration laws.

Furthermore, the ICE operation occurred after the city council had voted to terminate an agreement between OPD and ICE. However, according to city records, the police department and city administrator didn't end the agreement until Aug. 25, nine days after the raid.

Councilmember Rebecca Kaplan joined Brooks in requesting the hearing.

The hearing was recommended by the city's Privacy Advisory Commission, which is tasked with examining matters of privacy and civil liberties. Last Thursday, the commission's chair, Brian Hofer, published a memo about the ICE raid raising questions about whether the Oakland police spread false information, and whether OPD Chief Anne Kirkpatrick made false statements.

Among the issues raised by Hofer:

On the day of the raid, the OPD issued a notification saying ICE was carrying out a "sex trafficking" operation involving "juveniles."

But there is no evidence that the raid was conducted pursuant to any sex trafficking allegations. OPD later deleted the notification and issued a different one stating it was a "human trafficking" investigation instead.

However, there is no evidence of human trafficking in the case. At last week's hearing, Hofer said, "The chief repeatedly supplied false information."

Later, Kirkpatrick again claimed in a public forum that the individual who was arrested during the raid had been charged with a crime, and that "there is not a deportation matter in this case."

But the man who was arrested hasn't been charged with a crime. Instead, ICE filed paperwork to have him deported for a civil immigration violation.

It's unclear whether ICE agents purposely misled Kirkpatrick and OPD into believing they were helping with a criminal investigation, when in fact, they were assisting in a deportation matter — in violation of Oakland's sanctuary city law.


Thursday’s Briefing: Deadly Sonoma Fire Now Partially Contained; Oakland’s Air Quality Is 2nd Worst in Nation After Napa

by Robert Gammon
Thu, Oct 12, 2017 at 10:18 AM

COURTESY OF CHP
  • Courtesy of CHP

Stories you shouldn’t miss for Oct. 12, 2017:

1. Firefighters are starting to make some headway with the largest of the deadly North Bay blazes, gaining 10 percent containment on the Tubbs Fire, which ravaged Santa Rosa earlier this week, and 3 percent containment on the Atlas Fire in Napa, reports Lisa Fernandez of KTVU. The death toll from 22 Northern California fires this week has reached 24, and the number of missing people is still more than 200.

2. Oakland’s air quality, because of thick smoke from the North Bay fires, is the second worst in the nation, behind only Napa, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland’s air is “unhealthy” to breathe, registering a 161 on the index gauge, behind Napa’s 167. San Francisco and San Rafael registered at 155 and Livermore at 145. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District predicted that air pollution will worsen in the region on Friday and Saturday.

3. Schools throughout the East Bay closed today — although not Oakland schools — because of the smoky air, including West Contra Costa schools, reports Eric Ting of SFGate.com. In addition, the Pittsburg Unified, Martinez Unified, Mount Diablo Unified, and Antioch Unified school districts closed today. Oakland canceled PE and other outdoor activities and allowed students to stay home without being considered absent.

4. The Alameda school board is calling on the city to ban new cannabis facilities from opening within 1,000 feet of schools, reports Peter Hegarty of the East Bay Times$. The sale of marijuana for adult recreational use becomes legal in California on Jan. 1, and the city of Alameda is planning on permitting cannabis dispensaries on the Island.

5. Alameda Encinal High School teacher Kevin Gorham and Oakland Unified special education teacher Stephanie Taymuree have been named co-teachers of the year in Alameda County, reports Peter Hegarty of the East Bay Times$. Gorham, who teaches AP government and economics, is known for leading the student-run radio station at Encinal.

6. And President Trump signed an executive order today that will allow insurance companies to sell health plans that do not protect people with pre-existing medical conditions — a move that health policy experts say will undermine Obamacare and drive up prices for sick people, The New York Times$ reports.

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Guest Editorial: Helping African-American Men Over 65 to Stay Healthy and Live Longer

Addressing sleep, stress, and racism.

by Dr. Vickie M. Mays and Kaylin D. Wesley
Thu, Oct 12, 2017 at 9:58 AM

Science commonly points to poor sleep quality as a factor in bad health conditions. We often focus on sleep for adolescents, encouraging them to sleep 8 hours every night to help with their physical development.

However, there is less focus on the sleep habits of African-American men over the age of 65. Studies show that minorities in the United States, particularly Blacks and Latinos, often have more sleep problems than whites.

Dr. Vickie Mays is investigating the mental health consequences of Black men being stopped and frisked by police. - COURTESY OF DR. VICKIE MAYS
  • courtesy of Dr. Vickie Mays
  • Dr. Vickie Mays is investigating the mental health consequences of Black men being stopped and frisked by police.
Lack of sleep can be a serious problem, especially for individuals over the age of 65. When you do not get enough sleep, insulin and stress hormone levels become raised, putting a person at risk for diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, or stroke.

So why are Blacks and Latinos more likely to have sleep problems? There are several explanations, but one theory is that chronic stress and accumulated trauma from racial discrimination can make it difficult to sleep well. According to Dr. Vickie M. Mays, a clinical psychologist and professor of health policy and management at UCLA, it can be hard for African Americans, for example, to sleep restfully when they have been treated badly or unfairly. Negative experiences with racism and race-based discrimination are enough to keep them up at night, replaying the experience over and over in their mind and thinking about what they could or should have done or said differently. Some experiences of racism, particularly those that may have put their life at risk, can be troubling and affect sleep.

In addition to the health consequences of poor sleep, science tells us that chronic stressors, such as experiencing racism and race-based discrimination, can accelerate the aging process in African-American men. In one study, David Chae, a research professor at Auburn University, found that African-American men who reported being treated badly or unfairly due to their race had shorter telomeres, which are biological markers that indicate how well a person is aging. Telomeres shorten over the course of a lifetime and are also associated with chronic, life-threatening diseases such as diabetes, stroke, heart disease, and dementia. Professor Chae finds that the experiences of racism experienced by Black men are associated with their telomeres being shorter and predicting more possibilities of bad health.

Many African Americans who suffer from chronic disease and illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease are often blamed for getting these diseases because of bad eating habits, lack of exercise, smoking, or drinking. Dr. Vickie Mays’ research at UCLA’s Center for Minority Health Disparities Solutions shows that experiencing racism on a daily basis can be a significant factor in wearing down the body and making it more susceptible to disease and illness.

Black men in particular are exposed to race-based stressors (i.e., racism) in various ways. Dr. Mays and her team are studying how stressful experiences such as those with the law, particularly with police encounters, can be related to the mental health of Black men. According to the Center for Policing Equity, Berkeley police officers were six times more likely to use force against African Americans than whites. Their report also showed that African-American drivers, compared to white drives, are nearly six times more likely to be pulled over and five times more likely to be searched. African Americans are also disproportionately stopped and searched in Oakland. Between September 2014 and September 2015, African Americans accounted for 70% of all stops and 76% of all searches, despite representing just 26.5% of Oakland residents, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. The same patterns are seen in Chicago, Los Angeles, Greensboro, N.C., and Ferguson, Mo., to name a few.

These stops, known as “Terry” stops, oftentimes involve physical violence, excessive force, and racial/ethnic degradation, as noted by Dr. Amanda Geller and colleagues. In addition to the physical trauma, Terry stops have the potential to inflict emotional and psychological traumas, particularly if the person stopped believed that their race or ethnicity was the reason for the stop. Dr. Geller and colleagues also found that the young men who reported harsh police contact had increased anxiety and trauma associated with their experiences. These experiences are not new. In fact, there is a longstanding history of intrusive and/or traumatic encounters, each often with their own mental and physical health consequences for those who experience them. Many African-American men, particularly older men, have had these experiences and lived to tell their stories.

Dr. Mays believes that not enough attention is paid to the connection between the daily experiences of racism and the high rates of ill health in African-American men. For example, how are events like stop-and-frisks impacting the mental and physical health of Black men? Dr. Mays and her team at UCLA are trying to understand and document how the constant discrimination and prejudice African-American men face is related to their health later in their lives.

Through listening to the stories of these experiences, Mays hopes she will be able to document how racist treatment sets into motion a set of responses from always being on guard to protect oneself to feeling overwhelmed at having to defend oneself that gets translated into chronic health problems.

Dr. Mays is interested in interviewing African-American men 65 and older to tell their stories. The interviews are conducted over the phone, and study participants can remain anonymous. If you or someone you know is an African-American man over 65 years old and has a story to share, please call 707-928-4041. Participants will receive a $10 gift card.

Dr. Vickie Mays, director of the UCLA Center for Bridging Research Innovation, Training and Education for Minority Health Disparities Solutions, is a scholar, teacher, and researcher interested in the impact of racism on the health of African Americans. She is currently investigating the mental health consequences of Black men being stopped and frisked by police. (mays@ucla.edu)








Wednesday, October 11, 2017

East Bay Businesses Rally Behind Fire Victims

by Janelle Bitker
Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 5:03 PM

IMAGE COURTESY OF SANTA ROSA POLICE DEPARTMENT'S FACEBOOK PAGE
  • image courtesy of Santa Rosa Police Department's Facebook page

As deadly fires continue to rage across Sonoma and Napa counties, some Bay Area business owners are showing their support by organizing special events or setting up donation centers. Here’s a roundup, and we’ll add more opportunities as we see them:


Agave Oakland will donate 10 percent of all proceeds to fire relief through Sunday, Oct. 22. Chef-owner Octavio Diaz lives in Santa Rosa and has another location of the restaurant in Healdsburg.
2135 Franklin St., Oakland, AgaveUptown.com.

Gather is dedicating its usual Wine Wednesday events for the rest of October to raise money for North Bay Fire Relief Fund. The restaurant will donate 50 percent of all wine sales by the bottle and glass. At lunch, brunch, and dinner every day until Oct. 31, 5 percent of wine on tap sales will also be donated.
2200 Oxford St., Berkeley, GatherRestaurant.com.

The Black Squirrel is seeking donations of knitting needles, crochet hooks, and unopened skeins of yarn. The shop will match all yarn donations and work to send knitting kits to displaced people on Monday.
651 Addison St., Suite B, Berkeley, BlackSquirrelBerkeley.com.

Cat Town Cafe is working with Oakland Animal Services to make room for displaced cats and looking for foster homes. Cat Town is waiving adoption fees, encouraging folks to put that money toward fire relief instead. The staff at Hopalong and Second Chance Animal Rescue is already in Sonoma gathering animals from shelters and is getting together supplies and foster homes.


And many businesses have set up donation centers, although the North Bay shelters have stated they are well-stocked on many supplies. Check with these businesses to see if they're still actively collecting donations: The Well Cafe (5443 Telegraph Ave., Oakland), Starline Social Club (2236 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Oakland), 1-2-3-4 Go! Records (420 40th St., Suite 5, Oakland), and Bay Grape (376 Grand Ave.).



Wednesday’s Briefing: NorCal Death Toll Reaches 17 as Fires Spread; Bay Area Air Is Dirtiest Ever

by Robert Gammon
Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 10:07 AM

SONOMA COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
  • Sonoma County Sheriff's Office

Stories you shouldn’t miss for Oct. 11, 2017:

1. The death toll from this week’s fires in Northern California has reached 17, and more than 500 people are still reported missing, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. More than 170,000 acres have burned, and some fires are spreading, forcing additional evacuations in Sonoma, Napa, Solano, and other counties. Dangerous and gusty winds forecast for this afternoon prompted the National Weather Service to issue another red flag warning for the North Bay.

2. This week’s fires have created the dirtiest air in modern Bay Area history, reports Denis Cuff of the East Bay Times$, citing reports from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. “We are reporting the worst air quality ever recorded for smoke in many parts of the Bay Area,” said Tom Flannigan, spokesman for the air district. Soot readings in the region have reached very unhealthy or hazardous levels.

3. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld an Alameda County law that bans gun shops from being within 500 feet of schools, liquor stores, and residential neighborhoods, reports David DeBolt of the East Bay Times$. The court ruled that the constitutional right to own firearms does not extend to selling them. The county law was challenged by a San Lorenzo gun store.

4. And crews found what appear to be human remains in Alameda while doing earthquake retrofit construction work on old Alameda High School, reports Peter Hegarty of the East Bay Times$. Investigators think that the remains may be Native American. The school was built in 1925.

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Oakland Develops New Approach to Fixing Dangerous Intersections Faster

by Jessica Lynn
Tue, Oct 10, 2017 at 4:03 PM

Four months after a community activist was killed in a hit-and-run crash near Lake Merritt, Oakland transportation officials announced Tuesday a new plan for how to improve the safety of dangerous intersections more quickly.

On June 2, 68-year-old Robert Bennett, a nonprofit founder who advocated for juvenile justice and mental health policy reform, was struck and killed while in the crosswalk at the intersection of Harrison and 23rd streets in the city's Uptown district.

Traditionally, the city of Oakland has tried to approach similar tragedies with significant infrastructure changes to streets that often require major construction and can take years to complete, according to city  spokesperson Sean Maher. But at the Harrison and 23rd streets intersection, the Oakland Department of Transportation used a simple paint job to widen the median, create a bike lane, and make the crosswalk larger and more visible.

The street improvement was completed in about 10 weeks and cost around $30,000, Maher said. Since the renovation, there’s been an 86 percent increase in drivers stopping for pedestrians in the crosswalk, according to the Oakland Department of Transportation.

“We’re not going to stick to the old processes where took five years to get anything done,” Maher said.

COURTESY OF THE CITY OF OAKLAND
  • Courtesy of the city of Oakland

According to a city press release, Oakland’s transportation department aims to continue these implementing these quick fixes that can prevent vehicles from speeding or failing to stop for pedestrians — the two issues that lead to the most traffic deaths nationwide.

A 2017 report from Oakland’s Department of Transportation found that more than a third of the city’s pedestrian injuries and deaths occur on just 2 percent of Oakland streets. The city hopes to begin improving some of these high-risk corridors with upcoming road safety projects at the intersection of 8th and Fallon Streets in West Oakland and Fruitvale Avenue in the Fruitvale district, the press release stated. The city also noted that adding bike lanes helps to slow down traffic.

Alvin Lester, co-founder of the advocacy group San Francisco Bay Area Families for Safe Streets, said he thinks that Oakland’s new strategy is a step in the right direction.

“These improvements will save lives, immediately and in the long run,” said Lester, who lost his only son to a fatal traffic accident. “Nobody wants to get a call that says their loved one has been ran over and killed.”

Tuesday’s Briefing: 13 Dead, 150 Missing in North Bay Blazes; Wildfires Also Ravage Sierra Foothills

Plus, the Trump administration plans to roll back Obama-era climate change rules.

by Robert Gammon
Tue, Oct 10, 2017 at 9:54 AM

The Tubbs fire destroyed the Coffey Park neighborhood in Santa Rosa. - PHOTO COURTESY OF CHP
  • Photo courtesy of CHP
  • The Tubbs fire destroyed the Coffey Park neighborhood in Santa Rosa.

Stories you shouldn’t miss for Oct. 10, 2017:

1. The massive fires that have ravaged Sonoma, Napa, and Mendocino counties have killed at least 13 people, and 150 people have been reported missing, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The blazes have destroyed at least 1,500 structures and burned more than 100,000 acres. The so-called Tubbs Fire, which began near Calistoga and swept through Santa Rosa, wreaked the most devastation, leveling entire neighborhoods and prompting tens of thousands of residents to flee. Several wineries, restaurants, and iconic Wine Country businesses also burned to the ground.

2. Wildfires are also ripping through Yuba, Butte, and Nevada counties in the Sierra foothills, torching 20,000 acres and forcing widespread evacuations, the Sacramento Bee$ reports. And a major fire in Orange County has destroyed at least 24 structures, the LA Times$ reports. The blazes, like the ones in the North Bay, have been fueled by hot, dry autumn winds.

3. Trump administration EPA head Scott Pruitt announced that his agency will roll back Obama-era climate change rules, The New York Times$ reports. The move will overturn Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which was designed to slash greenhouse gas emissions, and will make it unlikely that the United States will live up to the Paris climate accords.

4. Tens of thousands of Puerto Rican residents continue to flee to the U.S. mainland, three weeks after Hurricane Maria devastated the island, the LA Times$ reports. As U.S. citizens, the evacuees have the right to move to anywhere in the country. And the Trump administration continues to come under fire for its slow-footed response to the Puerto Rico disaster.

5. And the Washington Post$ reports that President Trump made at least 1,328 false or misleading statements during the first 263 days of his administration. He has averaged five false or misleading claims a day.

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