Unfair Punishment Part Two: Sentenced to Poverty 

The state often traps formerly incarcerated people — even those convicted of low-level offenses — with insurmountable debts.

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But with outstanding restitution debts, Teeoni is unable to access many of the student loans she would need for law school. She also can't get a Certificate of Rehabilitation, an official document that is required for admission to law school and one that could significantly boost her future job prospects.

This is despite the fact that she has, by every other measure, rehabilitated her life.

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