Letters for June 18 

Readers sound off on the Alameda Theater, Mario Juarez, John Yoo, global hunger, Oakland police, Pete Stark, and the mass dissemination of dumbness.

"Alameda Theater, The Sequel," News, 5/21

One More Happy Taxpayer

I am moving back to Alameda after being away for many years and I am delighted about this renovation. I'll happily pay my share of higher taxes to enjoy a gem like this in a town with no other movie theater.

Liz Barrett, Alameda

Worth a Try

There is one similar theater from a while back in Sonoma County that restored the original theater (the Raven) and built around the corner (not directly connected?) a multiplex. The Raven then showed vintage and independent files (if I remember correctly). So someone did do something similar!!! In Healdsburg. I don't know if they are going strong but the combination of vintage (my favorite) and new screens to bring people into the area is good.

And theaters bring restaurant customers if the theater is in a restaurant district. Both "feed" each other economically so the investment is better for a downtown area. If done right these sort of investments are worthwhile for a city. But, unfortunately, it is a very difficult and very specific way to do it, they can fail so easily if done in a variety of ways other than the narrow few that would work (location-specific, so what works varies). I hope that the Alameda theater project succeeds. It's worth it.

Randolph D. Garrett, Antioch

Civic Debt, the Sequel

The best place to see the new parking garage? From inside the restored theater. :)

I guess deadlines and space prevented Rin Kelly from talking about the roughly $40 million of debt that Alameda City Council issued through the redevelopment agency — without voter approval — to build the parking garage and the megaplex, when most people only wanted the historic theater restored. Other cities, like El Cerrito, found ways to restore their historic cinema without issuing tens of millions of dollars of debt arbitrarily.

David Howard, Alameda

"Candidate for Council Has a Troubled Past," Full Disclosure, 5/21

Hope for the Future

I agree that Oakland City Council candidate Mario Juarez should not be elected to the office as he has some unfinished problems from his past. However, I also believe that Juarez is the most promising future leader for Oakland.

As a concerned citizen living near Oakland, I realize that this city's future, for better or for worse, hugely depends on the vision and mission of the city's representatives. Juarez, whose campaign is endorsed by Oakland Teachers and the Democratic Party, seems to hold the key to lead Oakland to greater heights. In his formal statement posted on his web site, he was able to capture the most urgent problems this city needs to address, including decreasing crime through his Safety First Plan, improving homeownership program for low-income employees, and triggering economic growth for the city.

While some might be concerned with his questionable past, it should be taken into consideration that he has proven himself to be a better person right now. As a real estate agent, Mario Juarez Selling Team currently employs around sixty people and is thriving. Moreover, the issue pertaining to his inexperience in the political field should not even be brought up as America believes in giving equal chances for everyone to run for office.

I believe that despite his troubled past, Juarez is a promising potential leader that should be supported. It might not be wise to vote him to the office at the present moment, but the city should watch and support him as he tries to make amends from his past, because here is the person that could change Oakland's future for the better.

Athalia Nakula, Emeryville

Editor's Note

Mario Juarez was not successful in his bid for the Oakland City Council.

"The Torture Professor," Feature, 5/14

The Constitutional Case

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