Mitchell Halberstadt 
Member since Jul 15, 2013


Stats

Favorite Places

  • None.
Find places »

Saved Events

  • Nada.
Find events »

Saved Stories

  • Nope.
Find stories »

Custom Lists

  • Zip.

Recent Comments

Re: “For MLK Holiday, Activists Tear Down Fence and Take Over Oakland's St. Andrew's Plaza in the Name of 'Black Joy'

Great comment by Carol Wyatt, which only confirms what I noted in my earlier comments here: the (missing) heart of the story is the status of the City's renovation plan for the park, and the need for continuing community involvement (which shut it down in the first place) -- NOT the (unchallenged) ideology of a clique of self-appointed arbiters of "Black Joy."

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 01/17/2017 at 8:49 AM

Re: “For MLK Holiday, Activists Tear Down Fence and Take Over Oakland's St. Andrew's Plaza in the Name of 'Black Joy'

The article also mentions plans for the park's "renovation, using a $456,000 grant, [that ostensibly] would transform the area into a welcoming space for all," but fails to discuss the current status of those plans. Isn't that the heart of the story -- even if a clique of self-appointed arbiters of "Black Joy" meanwhile have a plan of their own that they seek to impose on the neighborhood instead?

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 01/16/2017 at 8:41 PM

Re: “For MLK Holiday, Activists Tear Down Fence and Take Over Oakland's St. Andrew's Plaza in the Name of 'Black Joy'

If, indeed, "a group of neighbors had complained for years that the sliver of land was a magnet for illegal drug use and crime," why weren't any of them interviewed for this story? For that matter, those neighbors were evidently there for years: were all of them white? As neighbors (not to mention other passers-by) did they find that park intimidating?

A power play is a power play -- a battle for control (with conflicting cultural norms being weaponized by both sides). "Displacement" cuts both ways.

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 01/16/2017 at 8:26 PM

Re: “An Open Letter to Our Community, From the Former Residents of the Recently Closed LoBot Gallery in West Oakland

Francesco writes: "I know a manager at one of the local Bank of America branches who is always looking for young people who want a start in the banking and finance industry. Why not stop in and inquire?.... Then you could do your artwork at night."

That means assuming that what B of A does is more worthwhile than what artists do, and must be assigned higher priority -- with creativity relegated to whatever time's left over. However, such values can also be seen as those of a warped corporate system that's increasingly totalitarian as it crowds out other options (and demands more and more of our time and attention).

Under the circumstances, it's no wonder that people start looking for workarounds -- some more viable than others. I might suggest driving for Lyft or Uber rather than working at B of A, but there are problems with that as well. Unfortunately, all the alternatives are makeshift.

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 12/13/2016 at 12:38 AM

Re: “'Big Soda' Is Suing Oakland Over Beverage Tax Measure

Colin Fletcher-Schmidt, the problem is "empty calories." Soda is pure garbage. Be happy it's legal.

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 10/15/2016 at 1:39 PM

Re: “Beverage-Industry Playbook Expands as 'Big Soda' Spends Large to Defeat Oakland and San Francisco Taxes

Money isn't everything, Gerry! Voters won't believe the lies if they realize that they're lies. The industry needs to be called out clearly and sharply on the nature of those lies (as I've described).

Whining about being outspent isn't the answer. Smarter counter-advertising might do the trick.

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 10/12/2016 at 11:23 AM

Re: “Beverage-Industry Playbook Expands as 'Big Soda' Spends Large to Defeat Oakland and San Francisco Taxes

Why don't proponents of the measure feature store owners who say they'll compensate for the tax by raising prices on soda alone -- that the tax won't affect the cost of other groceries? They can even point out that it's the soda industry itself that would benefit by pressuring grocers to shift the tax onto other items.

This is a no-brainer. Proponents of the measure should respond directly to the attacks with such a clear presentation.

Posted by Mitchell Halberstadt on 10/11/2016 at 8:32 PM

All Comments »

Readers' Favorites

Most Popular Stories


© 2017 East Bay Express    All Rights Reserved
Powered by Foundation