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Located in the historic Croll building, the Alameda bar and eatery has offerings for the thirsty and hungry alike. Patrons can stop by on weekends for an American-style breakfast on the bar's patio and start the drinking early with $10 bottomless mimosas and other morning-time libations. As the day wears on, the menu turns to bar fare like pulled-pork sliders and BBQ chicken wings.

Serves breakfast and lunch made from organic, locally grown ingredients, including house-cured cold cuts, daily roasted meats, and poached eggs.

Any bar that opens at 10 a.m. every day pegs itself as a certain sort of bar. The Churchward Pub is that sort of bar, making its name all the more ironic. During the daytime it's a regulars' bar, a place to grab a cheap happy hour drink, and a spot for Alamedans to just chill out, shoot some pool, or watch the game. But at night, when the DJ sets up and a younger crowd rolls in, the place converts to a rollicking quasi-dance club, with the occasional cover charge to boot. The next morning at ten, the cycle regenerates: just another day at the Churchward Pub.

A combination of friendly bartenders and hefty pours make this Alameda bar a great place to get sloshed.

Nestled between Alameda’s bustling Park Street and Alameda High School, this 92-year-old hall draws about 250 people on Friday nights for dancing to live zydeco, and occasional Saturdays for swing. These weekly gigs are not too unlike a church function -- except for the full bar hidden in the back corner — with punch bowls filled with Oreos, pretzels, and chocolate chip cookies, and regulars who affectionately call each other by name. Tables line the wooden dance floor in this four-hundred-capacity hall, and it’s easy to see why people of all ages and walks of life – from rockabillies to pimply-faced teens in Nirvana T-shirts to your aunt who frequents Ashkenaz – come for the guaranteed crowd and, oh yeah, the handy dance lesson beforehand.

The family-owned sports bar has thirteen flat-screen TVs and three huge projector screens for an all-encompassing sports experience on game days. There's plenty of promise in this Alameda bar. Namely, promises of pizza, pool playing, free Wi-fi, and a daily happy hour from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

This enduring Alameda bar has a wide selection of local craft beers, cocktails made from fresh-squeezed juices, and supposedly one of the longest wooden bars on the island. Shoot pool or enjoy tacos and trivia on Tuesdays. If you reserve your barhopping ventures for the weekends, every Saturday is 80's night, with DJ's, drinks specials, and general dance floor debauchery.

Forbidden Island

Forbidden Island is a tiki bar at its best, offering everything it takes to capture that elusive blend of island kitsch, pure spectacle, and festive mood: a nautical wood interior, gaudy cocktails, a jukebox crammed with vintage Martin Denny and Frankie Laine tunes, and a tropical lanai for outdoor guzzling. It’s apparently the only tiki bar in America that makes fresh fruit juice in-house every day, and there are appetizers of the deep-fried variety. Entertainment includes live surf-rock bands and dance parties with DJs.

Stepping inside this cozy venue might conjure up sweet memories of sunny days spent in your grandma's kitchen. Beyond beer and wine, the cafe offers up a simple but sweet home-style menu of soups, sandwiches, and baked goods like lemon pound cake. Live bands, from jazz to bluegrass acts, hit the stage weekly. The Station also caters private events in its lounge area or in the entire cafe.

Based on the Island’s facade — a nondescript stucco wall with red and green stripes — it’s difficult to fathom just how cool this Alameda joint is on the inside. Located a few blocks from the Webster Tube, it specializes in dancehall, reggae, R&B, merengue, and soca, erring more on the pop side. Thatched roofs, orange lanterns, and a small dance floor give the Island a real Caribbean isle feel. This is a weekend-only joint with a classy dress code. There’s no cover for Ladies Nite on Fridays, and there is a cover for Reggae International Saturdays with DJ Electro.

Wedged next to a car dealership on the crummier end of Alameda’s Park Street, this honky-tonk-ish dive bar features live music, karaoke, and pool tournaments Wednesdays through Saturdays. Decked out with a pool table, jukebox, Big Toy machine complete with lesbian porn, several tables, and a small stage, John Patrick’s is no supper club, but it’s a fun, cash only neighborhood watering hole.

Situated inside an old Alameda hotel building, the bar's Spanish-style art deco interior lends to its kitschy atmosphere. By day, it's a neighborhood bar frequented by locals; and by night the scene gives way to a younger crowd. A bonus: three flat-screen TVs and a pool table.

Preps and rockabilly scenesters comprise most of the clientele at this small, kitschy Alameda bar. It’s a little divey, but only in the best sense of the word: The drinks are strong, it’s not pretentious, and it’s even dog-friendly. Characterized by lava lamps and a checkerboard floor, Lost Weekend also features a DJ on Thursdays; a jukebox stocked with Eighties, rock, and punk; plus a full bar and pool table. It has an enclosed smoking patio and it’s right next to the 51A bus stop, an area where it’s relatively safe to walk around late at night. Plenty of street parking is available. Cash only.

You won’t find any Budweiser, Coors, or Miller on the menu at this Alameda bar, but don’t let that dissuade you, the beer list is long. There are more than twenty beers on tap, forty choices in bottles, and, of course, cold PBR. For wine lovers, Lucky 13 features local wines by the bottle, and there’s a full bar. The bar also has a pool table, pinball machines, a black-and-white photo booth, beer garden, and a jukebox full of rock, punk, and soul. There’s free popcorn to snack on, and food can be ordered from Scolari's, the restaurant next door.

The laid-back bar and grill, which has been around since 1977, is a go-to place to watch sports, eat Sunday brunch, and have a drink (it's rumored that after a few visits the bartender will have your drink poured before you've even taken a seat at the bar).

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