• 3:10 to Yuma (R)

    Classics-division-style remake of the 1957 Glenn Ford "adult Western" makes fine use of actors Russell Crowe (as a dandified brute of an outlaw gang leader), Christian Bale (a poor-but-honest rancher), Peter Fonda (a tough old coot), and a posse full of nasty desperados fussin' and cussin' violently in Old Arizona. more...
  • Appaloosa (R)

    In Appaloosa, Ed Harris and Viggo Mortensen play mercenary lawmen hired by the violent titular town to put an end to the criminal reign of rancher Randall Bragg (Jeremy Irons). more...
  • Blackthorn (R)

    Gorgeous Bolivian scenery, matching cinematography by Juan Ruiz Anchia, and Sam Shepard’s crotchety, Sam-the-Lion portrayal of the aging yanqui outlaw Butch Cassidy – all those can’t compensate for the slack writing and unsteady direction of actors in Mateo Gil’s sequel to Paul Newman/Robert Redford/George Roy Hill’s iconic 1969 western Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. more...
  • Cowboys & Aliens (PG-13)

    It might have been a good idea at first to add reptilian, gold-seeking, extra-terrestrial invaders to the story of a lone amnesiac cowpoke (Daniel Craig) riding into an Old West frontier town looking for trouble – as a straight-up western, it’s going nowhere. more...
  • Django (NR)

    For all its then-shocking brutality and lurid predicaments, Sergio Corbucci’s 1966 spaghetti western — inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's upcoming Django Unchained — looks today like more of a Hollywood-type violent oater with an Italian and Spanish cast than a radical rethink of the genre, à la Sergio Leone. more...
  • Django Unchained (R)

    Quentin Tarantino’s best movie since Jackie Brown is a sprawling, bloody, vulgar, unexpectedly humorous, action-packed tribute, not only to the filmmaker’s beloved spaghetti westerns and slavesploitation shockers such as Mandingo, but to — you’ll excuse the expression — the American sense of frontier justice. more...
  • Down in the Valley (R)

    The protagonist of David Jacobson's ambitious psychological thriller is an out-of-time, out-of-place cowboy (the amazing Edward Norton) who conducts himself with the solemn dignity of Wyatt Earp or Shane. more...
  • The Good, the Bad, the Weird (Joheun-nom, Nabbeun-nom, Isanghan-nom) (R)

    Korean filmmaker Kim Jee-woon’s helter-skelter tribute to Sergio Leone -- and, by the way, Quentin Tarantino -- follows the extra-strenuous antics of a disheveled bandit (Song Kang-ho, “The Weird”), a bounty hunter (Jung Woo-sung, “The Good”), and a dapper gunslinger (Lee Byung-hun, “The Bad”) as they race across pre-WWII Manchuria trading fusillades of bullets with each other, the invading Japanese army, and more bandidos. more...
  • The Lone Ranger (PG-13)

    Pretty much what we’d expect from a collision of Johnny Depp, director Gore Verbinski, producer Jerry Bruckheimer, and the resuscitation of nobody’s favorite old TV show — starring a muttering Native American would-be shaman with a dead bird on his head (Depp’s Tonto) and a brave-but-awkward nincompoop in a mask (Armie Hammer in the title role) in the wild west. more...
  • Meek's Cutoff (PG)

    Filmmaker Kelly Reichardt throws a wet blanket over the traditional conventions of the screen western with this taciturn, somber account of a lost party of white settlers wandering in the high desert, circa 1845. more...
  • September Dawn (R)

    Written and directed by Christopher Cain (Young Guns), this squishy historical drama revisits the Mountain Meadows massacre of 1857, when renegade Mormons wiped out 120 settlers crossing the Utah Territory. more...
  • The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (R)

    Tommy Lee Jones, making his directorial debut, stars as a ranch foreman named Pete Perkins, who seems to be the only one bothered when Melquiades Estrada (Julio Cesar Cedillo) turns up dead in the desert. more...

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