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Waka Flocka Flame

Thu., Aug. 27, 10 p.m.
415-431-7444
Waka Flocka Flame
“I’m very pleased to announce today on 4/20 — the best day of the year — that I’m running for President,” said Waka Flocka Flame — who plays on Thursday at 1015 Folsom (1015 Folsom St., San Francisco) — in a recent interview with Rolling Stone. Never mind that he’s about seven years too young, the Atlanta rapper has a proper platform. There’s the pot priority, naturally, and Waka further specified that he objects to dogs in restaurants. So, look out for that executive order. (It’s unclear whether his old partners at PETA will cosign it). About foreign policy, Waka didn’t indicate much. Still, considering his ongoing collaboration with Canadian EDM outfit Neon Dreams, the rapper prioritizes cultural exchange. Now, by this point, Waka is an entrepreneur whose best-known record, Flockavelli, spins off of a term associated with political deceit, so perhaps his apparent plans to collapse the branches of government into his control shouldn’t be surprising: “Fuck the Congress. I am Congress. I’m President!” $17.50, $20
1015 Folsom Nightclub 1015 Folsom St., San Francisco (map)

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Nepantla Second Issue Release

Fri., Aug. 28, 7 p.m.
Nepantla Second Issue Release
Nepantla: A Journal Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color aims to create intentional space for QPOC narratives and art in America, celebrating multiplicity and continual reinvention. It will also celebrate the release of its second issue on Friday, August 28 at Berkeley City College (2050 Center St.) with a reading co-presented by ZYZZYVA, featuring four of its associated poets. Among them are Jewelle Gomez, the author of seven books, including the Black lesbian vampire novel The Gilda Stories, and founding board member of the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation; Yosimar Reyes, a gay, Mexican-born poet and activist whose work often addresses immigration issues; Arisa White, the author of the full-length poetry collections Hurrah’s Nest and A Penny Saved; and Marvin K. White, the author of four collections of poetry, board member of Fire & Ink, a national Black LGBT writer’s organization, and former member of the acclaimed Black gay theater group Pomo Afro Homos. Clearly, the lineup is glowing, and one too (unfortunately) rare to pass up. Free
Berkeley City College 2050 Center St., Berkeley (map)

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East Bay Front Runners

, Saturdays, 9-10 a.m.
510-981-6740

Running needn't be a solitary sport, and for the East Bay Front Runners it's a veritable social occasion. Camaraderie and friendship take first billing at the group's weekly runs, with fitness a close second and competition a non-issue. The club formed in 1984 to serve the entire LGBT community and is also open to friends, family, and supporters. The group meets at a different East Bay marina or waterfront each week and then proceeds to a nearby eatery for a group brunch. Guests and non-members welcome. Visit EastBayFrontRunners.org for weekly locations.

free
Berkeley Marina 201 University Ave., Berkeley (map)

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Amélie, A New Musical

Aug. 28-Oct. 4
510-647-2949
Amélie, A New Musical
Through the eyes of its quirky protagonist, Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s film Amélie cleverly captured the ways that even the most mundane details of day-to-day life can be made whimsical and wondrous with a little imagination. Though it was made fourteen years ago, Amélie has enjoyed enduring appeal and now makes its theatrical debut in the East Bay. Berkeley Repertory Theatre (2015 Addison St., Berkeley) kicks off its 2015–2016 season with the world premiere of Amélie, A New Musical. The play tells the story of Amélie, a sheltered young woman with an active imagination determined to do good deeds for others, however small. According to Berkeley Rep artistic director Tony Taccone, one of the challenges of bringing Jeunet’s film to the stage was conveying its highly stylized cinematography. Amélie, A New Musical is slated to be an audiovisual experience, with set design inspired by Renoir’s Parisian scenes, music by composer Daniel Messé of the band Hem, and a script adaptation by Pulitzer Prize-nominated playwright Craig Lucas. $29-$97
Berkeley Repertory Theatre 2025 Addison St., Berkeley (map)

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Security Question

Through Sept. 10
510-809-0900
Security Question
Security Question, the new juried exhibition at the David Brower Center (2150 Allston Way, Berkeley), approaches the titular topic from every angle. The notion of security has become an increasingly concerning question in America in recent years, and that’s partially because it morphs into new manifestations depending on the perspective you take. In Lino Azevedo’s painting “Natural Blindness,” for example, working people float in a forest, but are robbed of its beauty by blindfolds. The image makes a statement about financial security, which allows for stable living but often costs the other pleasures of life. Charlie Cotello’s “Monk Silhouette,” a photograph of three young monks playing with toy guns, calls upon conversations about gun violence and gun laws, while also alluding to Tamir Rice, the twelve-year-old boy who was shot by Cleveland police last year while holding a toy gun. Those are just two of the angles employed in the thought-provoking group show, which also features the work of Terry Berlier, Jerome Brunet, Rebecca Herman and Mark Shoffner, Gail Bravos, Rodney Ewing, Alison OK Frost, Linda Gass, Michael Hall, Carter Johnston, Kim Miskowicz, Maggie Preston, Paul Taylor, Jesse Walton, and Stephen Whisler.
Opening reception on May 28, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
$10 suggested donation
David Brower Center 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley (map)

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People's Secret History

Through Aug. 31
415-250-5527
People's Secret History
A sleekly designed poster has an authoritative voice. We’re culturally conditioned to listen up when we see nice fonts and well-placed wording. In the People’s Secret History: Group Show, which is coming to EM Wolfman Small Interest Bookstore (410 13th St., Oakland), artists leverage that aesthetic correspondence to legitimacy to amplify narratives from radical history that are often discredited. At this point, academic attention has been brought to the social underdog’s version of history — which would have been left out of textbooks in the past — but there are still many stories left unheard. Referring to these stories as “secret histories,” the artists in this group show are ready to reveal them in the form of informational posters — a style inspired by the Just Seeds Artists’ Cooperative poster series. Some of the featured stories challenge the dominant narrative of history to such an extent that they might even be deemed “conspiracy theories.” This show offers an opportunity to test to what extent perspectives that you might have questioned before become believable when presented with ad-like aesthetics. There will be an opening reception on August 6 at 7 p.m. with performances by Grey & Grey and Bad Carl Sagan. Free

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Fuzic

Fourth Friday of every month, 9 p.m.
510-832-4400
Fuzic
Every fourth Friday, DJ Fuze — best known for being a member of seminal Oakland hip-hop group Digital Underground — takes over the sound system at Era Art Bar (19 Grand Ave., Oakland). He knows his stuff — he produced for Tupac and worked with artists like The Luniz, Goapele, and Dave Chappelle. And although Fuze’s background is in hip-hop, he also spins R&B, soul, disco, and funk. At his monthly party at Era, he incorporates sounds from the Caribbean, Latin America, and Africa into his set as well. With such a diverse array of music, you won’t be bored. $10
Era Art Bar and Lounge 19 Grand Ave., Oakland (map)

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Stan Ridgway

Fri., Aug. 28, 8 p.m.
510-548-1761
Stan Ridgway
In the late Seventies, Stan Ridgway had a soundtrack production company across the street from The Masque, a fixture in the nascent Los Angeles punk scene. From the unlikely collision emerged Wall of Voodoo, a vessel of atmospheric terror, new wave instrumentation, and Ridgway’s noir themes that produced a substantial catalogue beyond its sole hit, “Mexican Radio.” Further, Ridgway’s post-Wall of Voodoo output is likewise rewarding: The Big Heat, his debut solo album from 1986, featured “Drive, She Said,” a cabbie’s first-person recollection of being happily forced to play getaway driver for a bank robber. Memorably, Ridgway collaborated with The Police’s Stewart Copeland on “Don’t Box Me In,” from the soundtrack to Francis Ford Coppola’s impeccably stylized Rumble Fish. The bleak portrait of fraternal camaraderie dovetails neatly with Ridgway’s haunted, cracked songs, which remain strong on his most recent album, Mr. Trouble. Ridgway performs at Freight & Salvage (2020 Addison St., Berkeley) on Friday. $23, $25
Freight & Salvage Coffeehouse 2020 Addison St., Berkeley (map)

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Hunnit Dollars

Sat., Aug. 29, 7 p.m.
Hunnit Dollars
The rapper formerly known as Stunnaman, from Berkeley rap group The Pack, of “Vans” and Lil B fame — was there for the beginning of #based. In an interview last year, Keith Jenkins pointed to hippie icon Wavy Gravy’s Camp Winnarainbow as the philosophy’s spiritual center, where the radiant positivity and collapsed sense of self evident in Lil B’s tweets first took shape. Jenkins recent output, however, skews more trap and carnal, with sinister intentions detailed in a ragged flow atop brooding, downcast production on this year’s Black Bart 2 EP. The more pertinent question, though, is about Jenkins’ visual art, which Good Mother Gallery (408 13th St., Oakland) is slated to exhibit for the very first time, with a weekend-long showcase opening on Saturday. Perhaps Hunnit Dollars, as it’s called, will explore the liminal zone between Camp Winnarainbow and the trap house. Jenkins’ Instagram is conspicuously absent of works-in-progress shots, unless that picture of Frida Kahlo’s eyebrows augmented with weed counts as one. At any rate, Lil B is the special guest. $10
Good Mother 408 13th St., Oakland (map)

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The Booty Bassment

Third Saturday of every month, 10 p.m.
415-550-6994
The Booty Bassment
If hours of dancing to mid-tempo bass-heavy hip-hop sounds as supremely satisfying to you as scoring a parking spot in downtown Oakland during First Fridays, then clear your schedule for the monthly Booty Bassment at The Knockout (3223 Mission St., San Francisco). True to its name, this second-Saturday party, featuring DJs Dimitri Dickinson and Ryan Poulsen, mixes classic and new hits from the likes of Too $hort and 2 Chainz, all for the goal of inducing mass rump-shaking. But unlike other parties, Booty Bassment manages to avoid being a total gropefest, so you can twerk, yike, and dip with abandon. Best of all, this gluteus festivity only costs $5, which is cheaper than Hipline, Zumba, or other dance workouts. Prepare your backside. $5
The Knockout 3223 Mission St., San Francisco (map)

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Friday Night Launch

, , Fridays, 7 p.m.
510-859-3150

Every Friday, the Launching Pad (2649 Russell St., Berkeley) hosts the Friday Night Launch, featuring spiritually focused spoken word, discussions, and music for young adults. The events start at 7 p.m. and are free, although donations are accepted; there's a group vegetarian dinner available at 6 p.m., too. 510-859-3150 or LaunchingPadBerkeley.com

free/donation
Launching Pad 2649 Russell St., Berkeley (map)

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Motown on Mondays

Mondays, 8 p.m.
510-891-8660
Motown on Mondays
Prozack Turner has certainly made good on his promise to “avoid the Top-40 hip-hop trap” at Legionnaire Saloon, his new Uptown bar. The venue’s parties showcase a wide variety of genres — disco, country, and more — and it recently began hosting one of the Bay’s longest-running weekly events, Motown on Mondays. Started in San Francisco in 2009, Motown on Mondays has since spread to Los Angeles, New York City, Austin, Honolulu, and now Oakland, and brings together young and old fans with its mix of Sixties soul, doo-wop, and R&B. At Legionnaire Saloon (2272 Telegraph Ave., Oakland), DJs have included Pam the Funkstress of The Coup and J-Boogie, and this week will feature DJ Fuze of Digital Underground. Fuze helped produce some of Digital Underground’s biggest hits, including “Freaks of the Industry,” “Doowutchyalike,” and “The Humpty Dance,” and has collaborated with Tupac and The Luniz, but he’s also made a name for himself as one of the Bay’s most eclectic cratediggers, amassing a collection of soul, house, and world music. Expect him to dust off some of his best records for the occasion. free
The Legionnaire Saloon 2272 Telegraph Ave., Oakland (map)

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The Jet Set

, Wednesdays, 9 p.m.
510-451-4677
The Jet Set
The son of a Guatemalan mother and Salvadorian mother, Erick Santero grew up in Panama and Costa Rica, studied in Puerto Rico and Cuba, and poached a lot of his musical knowledge from Latin scenes in New York. So it's no overreach for Santero to say he gets around Latin America, or that he tends to eschew borders. His fan base is centered in the Bay Area, for sure, but it's also spread throughout the Latino diaspora, as is his palette. As a DJ, he's known for mixing contemporary hip-hop with vocal samples filched from Cuban singer Celia Cruz, bachata rhythms that originated in the Dominican Republic, and cumbia styles of the Caribbean. His weekly world music party, called The Jet Set, features grooves from throughout the Americas, as well as parts of Asia and Africa, with a rotating lineup of guest DJs. Every Wednesday at Luka's Taproom (2221 Broadway, Oakand). 8 p.m., free. LukasOakland.com free
Luka's Taproom & Lounge 2221 Broadway, Oakland (map)

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Oh No, There's Men on the Land

Through Oct. 3
510-704-8291
Oh No, There's Men on the Land
In the Bay Area, reminiscing about — and laughing at — the idealism of the Sixties and Seventies never seems to get old. In fact, even just looking at tie-dye can elicit a chuckle from many East Bay longtimers. That must be why, after big success during its four-week run in Spring, Karen Ripley’s Oh No, There’s Men on the Land is coming back to the Berkeley Marsh Center for the Arts (2120 Allston Way) on August 15 to stay through October 3. The show is a hilarious monologue that takes the audience through Ripley’s rollercoaster of experiences as a young lesbian in early-1970s Berkeley. Ripley has been making audiences laugh for 35 years, with a specialty in LGBTQ-centric comedy. During that time, she’s won many awards as a screenplay writer and performer. Her comedic charisma surely has a lot to do with the show’s return as well. $15-$35
The Marsh Arts Center 2120 Allston Way, Berkeley (map)

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Friday Nights at OMCA

, Fridays, 5-9 p.m.
510-318-8400
Friday Nights at OMCA
East Bayizing the international tradition by which neighbors meet and eat in the moonlight, the Oakland Museum of California (1000 Oak St., Oakland) will hold its weekly night market on Friday: Off the Grid’s gourmet food trucks will offer artisanal local cuisine, with local beer and wine served in the Blue Oak beer garden. A Makers & Tasters discussion will bring together great minds in the brewing and gardening communities. Live music, dance lessons, a DJ, and an LGBT history tour of the museum help guests digest all that stout and kraut. $7.50
Oakland Museum of California 1000 Oak St., Oakland (map)

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