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Murder is Served (With a Side of Kimchi)

, Fri., Oct. 31, 6:30-9 p.m.
510-444-3100
Murder is Served (With a Side of Kimchi)
In honor of Halloween, West Oakland’s FuseBOX (2311A Magnolia St.) offers further proof that murder is a dish best served cold — or perhaps drizzled with garlic-and-ginger infused olive oil and eaten with a side of kimchi. On October 31, guests at FuseBOX will enjoy dinner and a show, as Amanda Moody will be on hand to perform excerpts from her award-winning one-woman show Serial Murderess, which offers a glimpse into the mind of women who kill. As for dinner, chef Sunhui Chang’s $45 prix-fixe will include such offerings as bone marrow prepared two ways, grilled octopus with cho jang, and a choice of three entrées: a monkfish and clam stew, rabbit barigoule, and a vegetarian option. A drink is included in the cost of admission. Reserve your seat by calling 510-444-3100. $45
FuseBOX 2311-A Magnolia Ave., Oakland (map)

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William Gibson

Fri., Oct. 31, 7 p.m.
510-653-9965
William Gibson
William Gibson is often credited with having predicted the internet before it was popularized. The Neuromancer (1984) author coined the term “cyberspace,” and described virtual environments and cultural phenomena (such as reality television) at a time when they were merely sci-fi fantasies. Gibson is a cyberpunk and speculative fiction icon, with three trilogies under his belt and an enormous cult following. This week, he is releasing his first book since 2010, The Peripheral. It’s a work of near-future fiction that takes place in two time periods, following two professional video game players, who, of course, are somehow also involved in the black market. Another given is that it’s a grim cultural critique, dissecting economic inequality by throwing it into the future, but keeping it contemporary enough to tether it to reality. Diesel, A Bookstore (5433 College Ave., Berkeley) will be hosting a Halloween party — complete with costumes — to celebrate his new release and the thirtieth anniversary of Neuromancer. Gibson will discuss the book and sign copies. For all of you cyberpunk nerds hiding out there, this could be the perfect opportunity to dress up as your favorite Gibson character around people who will actually get it. That, and finally meet a literary legend. Free
Diesel, A Bookstore 5433 College Ave., Oakland (map)

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Iceage

Fri., Oct. 31, 9 p.m.
415-552-7788
Iceage
For its recently released third album, Plowing into the Field of Love, the Danish punk band Iceage first offered a music video for its song, “The Lord’s Favorite.” It features the band in a sleazy desert environment — a skuzzy Vegas-playboy aesthetic — while crazed megalomaniacal boasts top vaguely Western guitar leads at a rollicking cadence. The initial shock of “The Lord’s Favorite” video is that it’s funny, something that the dour foursome, which is prone to treating interviewers curtly and employing militaristic imagery, hadn’t really done before. The next shock is that it’s a great song — brisk, balanced, and facetious but not smug, with varied and expressive vocal delivery. Overall, Plowing into the Field of Love corresponds to the pleasing departure of “The Lord’s Favorite.” It’s fitting, then, that the Danes, who play on Friday at the Elbo Room (647 Valencia St.), grace San Francisco on Halloween to flaunt their new look. $13
Elbo Room 647 Valencia St., San Francisco (map)

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Amen

Through Oct. 31
510-473-5919
<i>Amen</i>
To celebrate the fourth anniversary of Betti Ono (1427 Broadway, Oakland), gallery director Anyka Barber decided to reflect on the past by looking forward. For Amen, Oakland artists Amaryllis De Jesus Moleski and Kholi partnered to create a show that depicts an idealized present by envisioning it as a future history, with a focus on the inclusion of marginalized, queer people of color. The show features paintings by Moleski with poetry by Kholi interspersed among the works and written using cutout, water-colored letters, dreamily articulating the myth that Moleski illustrates. Moleski’s paintings collapse temporal context, telling a future that draws heavily from the past. The women she depicts float weightlessly, without a setting to restrain them. They have exaggerated proportions, with massive hands, feet, and large, powerful limbs, reminiscent of old renderings of Amazonian warrior women. They sport sneakers and 1980s-esque spandex getups, and hold guitars and gemmed scepters — all in a pastel palette. Moleski also used pastel-colored synthetic hair to weave a number of textiles emblazoned with ancient geometric symbols. She is interested in complicating the Western understanding of history and craft, showing that practices such as hair-braiding are just as culturally important as traditional artistic crafts. How will queer communities of color be remembered in the future? Together, Moleski and Kholi aim to answer that question through artistic determination. Free
Betti Ono Gallery and Shop 1427 Broadway, Oakland (map)

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Eighteencharacters

Through Oct. 31
Eighteencharacters
A racehorse’s name must consist of no more than eighteen characters, including spaces and punctuation. That means that “Eighteencharacters” is an acceptable name, but “Eighteen Characters” is not. For their show at Interface Gallery (486 49th St., Oakland), local artist trio Bonanza (Conrad Guevara, Lindsay Tully, and Lana Williams) took this rule as inspiration, along with other arbitrary aesthetics found at the Golden Gate Fields racetrack. In the gallery, an empty wooden frame dangles from the ceiling with a bright blue braid hanging from it. It looks like a horse’s tail hanging out of a stable — except in another universe in which everything is clean, shiny, and chic. A sculpture that resembles a finish-line flag stands in one corner, held down by green sandbags. The pieces resemble the races, but only very slightly, like props in an Eighties music video with a minimalist jockey theme. The overall installation is playfully self-aware, riffing off the way stage names adorn identity with romanticized representations of the self. — Sarah Burke Free
Interface Gallery 480 49th St., Oakland (map)

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Honey Soundsystem vs. Mighty Real

Sat., Nov. 1, 10 p.m.
415-762-0151
Honey Soundsystem vs. Mighty Real
Last week, the Express covered the latest Bay Area Retrograde compilation, assembled and issued by Josh Cheon on his Dark Entries label (“The Other Bart,” 10/22/14). Cheon isn’t merely a record label operator, but his other role in music and nightlife illuminates part of what makes him adept at releasing vital titles. As a member of the DJ collective Honey Soundsystem, Cheon is also keenly aware of what sounds make a crowd move, emote, and reach the uninhibited ideal of a party. Furthermore, Honey Soundsystem is charitable, having recently committed $5,000 to the fundraising campaign for CounterPulse’s new art and performance space. On Saturday at Mighty (119 Utah St., San Francisco), Mighty Real DJ David Harness joins Cheon and the Honey Soundsystem crew to spin deep house and disco for the perfect Halloween weekend continuation event. $10-$15
Mighty 119 Utah St., San Francisco (map)

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Doblar la Tierra

Through Nov. 2, 3-7 p.m.
<i>Doblar la Tierra</i>

There is currently a carved, wooden block inserted into the sidewalk in front of Random Parts (1206 13th Ave.), an experimental-leaning art gallery in Oakland's Eastlake district. If you press a piece of paper over the wood and rub it with graphite, a rough print of an old Ohlone village will appear. The piece is a reminder of what the Bay Area once looked like, before it was colonized and developed. The block is one portion of Doblar La Tierra, a show by Spanish artist Javier Arce. Arce is interested in the ambiguous distinction between space and place, and how notions of home and identity fit in between the two. Arce, who currently lives in Santander, Spain, recently returned to an old cabin in which he once lived, in the Cantabrian Mountains of northern Spain. When he arrived, he found that the frame had loosened and pieces of wood had fallen off. He took a few of these pieces and brought them to Oakland with him for his residency. Now they are arranged on the floor of Random Parts, offering a foundation on which the viewer may build his or her own contemplation of the topic. The show has many layers, including a zine with text by Monica Carballas, which offers an insightful and poetic rumination on the work. Finding the meaning behind the works might not be easy, but the process of searching for it is the real fruit of the experience.

Free
Random Parts 1206 13th Ave., Oakland (map)

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Gwar

Wed., Nov. 5, 7 p.m.
415-673-5716
Gwar
Gwar, which plays on Wednesday at the Regency Ballroom (1290 Sutter St., San Francisco), has been a band of metal-loving, intergalactic misanthropes since Ronald Reagan’s presidency. And ever since Reagan, Gwar has slaughtered the likeness of every president on stage and doused audiences in the resultant gore. The crowds love it. Extraterrestrials dismembering politicians and celebrities on stage, and then turning to the audience for more folks to defile. Gwar shows are enduring, popular, and one of a few environments which coax out attendees’ latent deviance and push political agendas into spectacular absurdity. When Gwar was spotlighted in the “shock rock” witch hunts of the 1990s, the band took the opportunity — in full freak regalia — to say smart things about youth culture. Earlier this year, the tragic death of Dave Brockie, the man behind Oderus Urungus, left Gwar without any original members. But since adding Vulvatron as a fierce, full-fledged “scumdog,” it’s as if, after felling so many politicians, Gwar is out to slaughter patriarchy next. $25
The Regency Ballroom 1290 Sutter St., San Francisco (map)

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REDWOLF

Saturdays, Sundays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Nov. 8
510-858-7383
<i>REDWOLF</i>
Have you ever thought, while reading the classic fairy tale Little Red Riding Hood, “You know what this story needs? More cunnilingus.” If you tire of the typical, moralistic views put forth in children’s stories, then Redwolf at The Flight Deck (1540 Broadway, Oakland) may be for you. It’s a fairytale for adults, and by that I mean to reference both the R-rated elements of the show and its smart, feminist appropriations of the genre’s tropes. In this modern version, almost all of the characters undergo a process of re-education, which gives the story an incisive, postmodern edginess. Speaking of edgy, Redwolf plays with the moody and atmospheric. It’s at times sinister and shocking (for the prudish or squeamish: The two sex scenes are brief and tasteful. However, one does briefly involve both male and female full-frontals, and Ragged Wing Ensemble recommends audience members be at least sixteen years old.). But for all of its darkness and eroticism, Redwolf is also light and playful. A few of the show’s frolicsome elements include foreplay with hand puppets, a stripping fight scene, and a large vagina diagram. Theatergoers shouldn’t expect an easy happily-ever-after ending from this modern retelling, but Redwolf nonetheless succeeds in bringing the house down. $25-$40
The Flight Deck 1540 Broadway Oakland, Oakland (map)

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Sarah Oppenheimer

Through Dec. 14
510-430-2164
Sarah Oppenheimer
New York-based artist Sarah Oppenheimer’s work is both beautifully deceptive and brilliantly revealing. With her spatial interventions, she creates immersive optical illusion-like phenomena by cutting areas out of walls, using mirrors to offer vantage points into adjacent spaces, and illuminating those spaces with tones of light. Her works disorient the viewer, creating mental wormholes that derail spatial instincts, and pointing to the ways in which architecture organizes our understanding of the world. The construction of these works is so elegant that it rejects the notion of having been handmade. Produced primarily from metal and glass, the installations resemble transcendent tears in reality. The artist’s process is also extremely involved. Oppenheimer, who received her MFA from Yale University, is interested in solving theoretical problems regarding how humans experience space. She also works extensively with architectural rendering software, miniature 3-D models, and diagrams, much like a scientist experimenting in a lab. The remnants of this process form an array of fascinating ephemera, which is now on view for the first time at the Mills College Art Museum (5000 MacArthur Blvd., Oakland) in the show Sarah Oppenheimer. The presentation of the models and renderings was painstakingly designed by the artist to form a particularly engaging viewing experience in the museum’s large, open gallery — one that will leave audiences questioning the conventions of their surroundings. free
Mills College Art Museum 5000 MacArthur Blvd., Oakland (map)

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Songs and Sorrows: Días de los Muertos 20th Anniversary

Through Jan. 4, 2015
510-318-8400
<i>Songs and Sorrows: Días de los Muertos 20th Anniversary</i>

The Oakland Museum of California (1000 Oak St.) has been showcasing vibrant Day of the Dead exhibitions and celebrations for two decades. This year's exhibition, Songs and Sorrows: Días de los Muertos 20th Anniversary, provides an extensive look at traditions of celebrating the holiday, from its pre-Hispanic origins onward. Artists include Jose Guadalupe Posada, Carmen Lomas Garza, Patssi Valdez, and Jesse Hernandez. In conjunction with the show, OMCA is hosting a community celebration on October 26 in the museum garden. The event will feature a Son Jarocho music and dance ensemble, as well as mariachi, marimba, and cumbia performances. Elaborate altars will also be featured, along with calavera (skull)-style face-painting, tortilla and sugar skull-making demonstrations, chalk art, an artisanal mercado (market) featuring local vendors, and food trucks serving Latin and fusion cuisine. While focusing on tradition, OMCA also aims to recognize contemporary expressions of the holiday practice, and how it has evolved throughout time. Tickets to the event (which are significantly cheaper than normal museum admission) also include entry to all of the galleries, making it a festive and fulfilling day for the entire family.

$4-$10
Oakland Museum of California 1000 Oak St., Oakland (map)

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Dragon Boat Racing

Saturdays, 8:45-10:30 a.m.
510-521-7555

It's not every day that you get an opportunity to help propel a fifty-foot-long boat through the waters of the Alameda-Oakland Estuary (2400 Mariner Square Dr., Alameda). But the Alameda Dragon Flyers -- a part-recreational, part-competitive band of paddlers -- gives you the chance each Saturday with free introductions to the two-thousand-year-old Chinese sport of dragon boating. The weekly sessions are open to athletes of all abilities, and the first three are free -- after that, participants are asked to join the California Dragon Boat Association for a $50-$120 annual fee. 8:45-10:15 a.m. 510-521-7555 or AlamedaDragonFlyers.com

free

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East Bay Front Runners

, Saturdays, 9-10 a.m.
510-981-6740

Running needn't be a solitary sport, and for the East Bay Front Runners it's a veritable social occasion. Camaraderie and friendship take first billing at the group's weekly runs, with fitness a close second and competition a non-issue. The club formed in 1984 to serve the entire LGBT community and is also open to friends, family, and supporters. The group meets at a different East Bay marina or waterfront each week and then proceeds to a nearby eatery for a group brunch. Guests and non-members welcome. Visit EastBayFrontRunners.org for weekly locations.

free
Berkeley Marina 201 University Ave., Berkeley (map)

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Grand Lake Farmers' Market

Saturdays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
800-897-3276
Grand Lake Farmers' Market
Equal parts fresh-produce hub, outdoor food court, and neighborhood block party, the Grand Lake Farmers’ Market (Grand Ave. and Lake Park Ave.) really does have something for everyone: live music for the head-bobbing set, a bouncy house for the kids, and high-quality people-watching for the rest of us. Mostly, though, the market functions as one helluva one-stop shop, whether you’re putting together a romantic picnic or picking up groceries for the week. Depending on the season, highlights might include Flavor Queen pluots from Kashiwase Farms, colorful heirloom tomatoes from Wild Boar Farms, a small wheel of aged triple-cream cheese from Cowgirl Creamery, and whatever happens to be on special at the Prather Ranch butcher stand. While you’re at it, grab a falafel salad from the LIBA Falafel food truck and some pork knuckles from Roli Roti. Just like that, Saturday’s lunch is served. free
Splash Pad Park Grand Ave. and Lake Park Ave., Oakland (map)

Write for Your Life

Mondays, 9-11:45 a.m.
510-525-0302

There are far worse ways to spend a Monday than doing some writing as meditation. Write for Your Life happens every Monday morning at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley (1 Lawson Rd., Berkeley), with participants writing in response to a reading at the top of the session. Reading aloud to the group is optional. 9:15-11:45 a.m., free. 510-524-2858 or UUCB.org

free
Unitarian Universalist Church 1 Lawson Rd., Berkeley (map)

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