Thursday, May 21, 2009

Kraut, Kvass, Bones Are Big Deals at Berkeley Coop Kitchen

By Anneli Rufus
Thu, May 21, 2009 at 2:22 PM

Following the directives of early 20th century holistic dentist Weston A. Price -- who asserted after examining the teeth of native communities worldwide that fat-and-meat-focused traditional cuisines are the key to good health -- a cooperative kitchen has opened in Berkeley where, every Wednesday and Thursday, customers pick up jars of bone broth, kraut, kombucha, kvass, pork rillettes, egg pies, and other locally sourced dishes rich in butter, whole milk, tropical oils, lard, grass-fed meat, and probiotic cultures.

Following the directives of early 20th century holistic dentist Weston A. Price -- who asserted after examining the teeth of native communities worldwide that traditional cuisines are the key to good health -- a cooperative kitchen has opened in Berkeley where, every Wednesday and Thursday, customers pick up jars of bone broth, kraut, kombucha, pork rillettes, egg pies, and other locally sourced dishes rich in butter, whole milk, tropical oils, lard, grass-fed meat, and probiotic cultures. These are the ingredients Price believed were best: Brochures distributed at Three Stone Hearth on University Avenue include "Got Butter?" (The implied correct reply is: Yes. A lot.)

"None of those native diets he studied were low-fat," says Jessica Prentice, one of the company's five worker-owners. (Many of the staff are volunteers.) Fats rather than carbohydrates were a main source of energy for the communities Price visited in Canada, Florida, Europe, South America, Africa, and the South Pacific -- he called them "primitives," using the parlance of his day, but in his view it was a compliment. Fermentation was also a Price priority, so a lot of that happens here in hefty crocks. Gelatin, too: Jars of blood-orange gelatin dessert await pickup on the day of our visit. Whole chickens simmer in forty-gallon "tilt skillets" which can be tipped so as to extract the resulting broth easily. Breads baked here utilize grains that have been soaked, sprouted, and soured.

The menu changes from week to week. When we visited, customers were collecting pork rillettes, fennel sauerkraut, kvass, coconut bars, beef broth, and other items including aromatic carbonated drinks made with roses and Douglas fir. (These are priced at $9.25 a bottle, as is kombucha, although that price includes a fully refundable bottle deposit.) Most customers pre-order online; some shop on the spot. Home deliveries are also possible. Few people wander in at random, because minimal signage renders virtual invisibility to this place, which for the past few months has subleased half of the space that once held Tuk-Tuk Thai supermarket; signs are due to go up next week. Alerted mainly via word of mouth, Three Stone Hearth's customers are "outside-the-box thinkers," Prentice says. "Waldorf parents, for example."

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Anonymous and pseudonymous comments will be removed.

Author Archives

Readers also liked…

Most Popular Stories

© 2016 East Bay Express    All Rights Reserved
Powered by Foundation